Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Host, höst, hőst, høst, and hosť

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hoste, borrowed from Old French oste (French: hôte), from Latin hospitem, accusative of hospes (a host, also a sojourner, visitor, guest; hence, a foreigner, a stranger), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóspot- (master of guests), from *gʰóstis (stranger, guest, host, someone with whom one has reciprocal duties of hospitality) and *pótis (owner, master, host, husband). Used in English since 13th century.

NounEdit

host (plural hosts, feminine hostess)

  1. One which receives or entertains a guest, socially, commercially, or officially.
    A good host is always considerate of the guest’s needs.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      Time is like a fashionable host, / That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand.
  2. One that provides a facility for an event.
  3. A person or organization responsible for running an event.
    Our company is host of the annual conference this year.
  4. A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
    The host was terrible, but the acts themselves were good.
  5. (computing, Internet) A server in a network.
  6. (computing, Internet) Any computer attached to a network.
  7. (ecology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    Viruses depend on the host that they infect in order to be able to reproduce.
  8. (evolution, genetics) An organism bearing certain genetic material.
    The so-called junk DNA is known, so far, to provide no apparent benefit to its host.
  9. A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

host (third-person singular simple present hosts, present participle hosting, simple past and past participle hosted)

  1. To perform the role of a host.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
    Our company will host the annual conference this year.
    I was terrible at hosting that show.
    I’ll be hosting tonight. I hope I’m not terrible.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To lodge at an inn.
    • Shakespeare
      Where you shall host.
  3. (computing, Internet) To run software made available to a remote user or process.
    • 1987 May 7, Selden E. Ball, Jr., Re: Ethernet Terminal Concentrators, comp.protocols.tcp-ip, Usenet
      CMU/TEK TCP/IP software uses an excessive amount of cpu resources for terminal support both outbound, when accessing another system, and inbound, when the local system is hosting a session.
    Kremvax hosts a variety of services.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English oost, borrowed from Old French ost, oste, hoste, from Latin hostis (foreign enemy) (as opposed to inimicus (personal enemy)); cognate with etymology 1 through an Indo-European root.

NounEdit

host (plural hosts)

  1. A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. X, Plugson of Undershot
      Why, Plugson, even thy own host is all in mutiny: Cotton is conquered; but the ‘bare backs’ — are worse covered than ever!
    • 2001, Carlos Parada, Hesione 2, Greek Mythology Link
      the invading host that had sailed from Hellas in more than one thousand ships was of an unprecedented size.
  2. A large number of items; a large inventory.
    A host of parts for my Model A.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English also oist, ost, from Old French hoiste, from Latin hostia (sacrificial victim).

NounEdit

host (plural hosts)

  1. (Christianity) The consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal òst, from Latin hostem, singular accusative of hostis, from Proto-Italic *hostis, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis (guest, stranger).

NounEdit

host m (plural hosts or hostos)

  1. army

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *gostь.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

host m

  1. guest
    Host do domu, Bůh do domu. ("A guest into the house, God into the house") — old proverb, meaning: respect should be shown to guests
    Host a ryba třetí den smrdí. - The guest and the fish smell the third day.

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • host in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • host in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English host.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

host m (plural hosts, diminutive hostje n)

  1. (computing) host
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From hossen.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

host

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hossen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hossen

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Related to hoste ("to cough").

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

host n (definite singular hostet, indefinite plural host, definite plural hosta or hostene)
host m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hoster, definite plural hostene)

  1. a single cough expulsion

Etymology 2Edit

From English host.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

host m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hoster, definite plural hostene)

  1. (computing) host
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

host

  1. imperative of hoste

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Related to hosta, hoste ("to cough").

NounEdit

host n (definite singular hostet, indefinite plural host, definite plural hosta)

  1. a single cough expulsion

Etymology 2Edit

From English host.

NounEdit

host m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hostar, definite plural hostane)

  1. (computing) host
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

host

  1. imperative of hosta and hoste

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English host.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

host m (plural hosts)

  1. (networking) host (computer attached to a network)