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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

yeer (plural yeers)

  1. Obsolete spelling of year

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ġēar, from Proto-Germanic *jērą.

NounEdit

yeer (plural yeeres or yeer)

  1. year
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Book II”, in Troilus and Criseyde (in Middle English), line 22-28:
      Ȝe knowe ek that in fourme of ſpeche is chaunge / With-inne a thousand ȝeer, and wordes tho /That hadden pris now wonder nyce and ſtraunge /Us thenketh hem, and ȝet thei ſpake hem so / And ſpedde as wel in loue as men now do / Ek forto wynnen loue in ſondry ages / In ſondry londes, ſondry ben vſages []
      You also know that the form of language is in flux; / within a thousand years, words / that had currency; really weird and bizarre / they seem to us now, but they still spoke them / and accomplished as much in love as men do now. / As for winning love across ages and / across nations, there are lots of usages []

DescendantsEdit