you can't put an old head on young shoulders

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

you can't put an old head on young shoulders

  1. Young people inevitably lack the experience and wisdom which come with age.
    • 1890, Horatio Alger, Driven From Home, ch. 30:
      "The boy seems to me a very good boy, but you can't put an old head on young shoulders."
    • 1901, Pauline E. Hopkins, Hagar's Daughter, ch. 25 (Google preview) (in The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins, Oxford, 1990, ISBN 9780195063257):
      "Young men will be young men; you can't put an old head on young shoulders," he added, repeating trite sayings as if they were original with himself.
    • 1970 April 1, Punch Imlach, "In crystal ball, Bruins get nod for first place," Windsor Star (Canada), p. 33 (retrieved 11 Dec 2012):
      The one knock against Bobby is that he is not great defensively. I think that's a valid criticism, but not altogether fair. You can't put an old head on young shoulders.
    • 2010 Dec. 14, Dean Ritchie, "Gutted Eels are left reeling," Herald Sun (Australia) (retrieved 11 Dec 2012):
      "All of a sudden they are now short of experience in the centres and wing. As the old saying goes, you can't put an old head on young shoulders."
    • 2011, Frank O'Connor, "Introduction to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" in The Best of Frank O'Connor, ISBN 9780307806727, p. 183 (Google preview):
      In those days I looked down on Stephens and repeated Russell's verdict with derision; which shows not only that you can't put an old head on young shoulders but that you shouldn't try.
Last modified on 12 December 2012, at 05:27