Translingual edit

Symbol edit

an

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Aragonese.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • (stressed)
    • IPA(key): /ˈæn/
    • (file)
    • Rhymes: -æn
    • IPA(key): [ˈɛən]
    • (file)
  • (unstressed)
    • IPA(key): /ən/
    • (file)
  • Homophone: in (in some accents)

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English an, from Old English ān (a, an, literally one). More at one.

Article edit

an (indefinite)

  1. Form of a (all article senses).
    1. Used before a vowel sound.
      I'll be there in half an hour.
    2. (now quite rare) Used before one and words with initial u, eu when pronounced /ju/.
      • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Numbers 24:8:
        God brought him forth out of Egypt; he hath as it were the strength of an unicorn: he shall eat up the nations his enemies, and shall break their bones, and pierce them through with his arrows.
      • (Can we date this quote?), John Mackay Wilson, Wilson's Tales of the Borders; Historical, Traditionary, and Imaginative[3], →OCLC, page 84:
        My hopes, from my earliest years, have been hopes of celebrity as a writer- not of wealth, or of influence, or of accomplishing any of the thousand aims which furnish the great bulk of mankind with motives. You will laugh at me. There is something so emphatically shadowy and unreal in the object of this ambition, that even the full attainment of its provokes a smile. For who does not know
        'How vain that second life in others' breath,
        The estate which wits inherit after death!'
        And what can be more fraught with the ludicrous than an union of this shadowy ambition with mediocre parts and attainments! But I digress.
      • 2010 March 22, Paul Taylor, “Greece Debates Revive Old European Fears and Resentments”, in The New York Times[4], →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2010-04-03, Inside Europe:
        President Nicolas Sarkozy of France is open to an European monetary fund but would want it to raise money cheaply on capital markets and lend it to needy euro-zone countries before they faced possible default.
      • 2021 April 13, Neil Vigdor, “Hank Aaron’s Name Will Replace a Confederate General’s on an Atlanta School”, in The New York Times[5], →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on April 14, 2021, U.S.‎[6]:
        In an unanimous vote on Monday, the city’s school board approved removing the name of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest from Forrest Hill Academy and calling the alternative school the Hank Aaron New Beginnings Academy.
      • 2024 February 14, Lawrence O'Donnell, 0:29 from the start, in Lawrence: Jack Smith asks SCOTUS to move fast on Trump. Nixon case is proof they can.[7], MSNBC, archived from the original on February 15, 2024:
        Having been given seven full days, Jack Smith took exactly one day to file a forty-page response in opposition, to the Supreme Court, making the argument that there was no reason for the Supreme Court to hear Donald Trump's appeal of an unanimous opinion by the second most important court in the country, the Washington, D.C. Federal Court of Appeals, which supported the trial judge's ruling that there is no such thing as immunity from criminal prosecution for former presidents.
      • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:an.
    3. (nonstandard) Used before /h/ in a stressed or unstressed syllable.
      • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Psalms 40:1–2:
        1 I waited patiently for the Lord, and he inclined vnto me, and heard my crie.
        2 He brought me vp also out of an horrible pit, out of the mirie clay, and set my feete vpon a rock, and established my goings.
      • 1693, Robert Morden, “Of China”, in Geography Rectified; or a Description of the World[8], 3rd edition, →OCLC, page 441:
        The Province of Nanking, by the Tartars called Kiangnan, is the ſecond in honour, in magnitude and fertility in all China : It is divided into 14 great Territories, having Cities and Towns an hundred and ten; Nanking, or Kiangning being the Metropolis; a City, that if ſhe did not exceed moſt Cities on the Earth in bigneſs and beauty, yet ſhe was inferior to few, for her Pagodes, her Temples, her Porcelane Towers, her Palaces and Triumphal Arches. Fungiang, Sucheu, Sunkiang, Leucheu, Hoaigan, Ganking, Ningue, Hoeicheu, are alſo eminent places, and of great Note and Trade.
      • 1953, Mao Tse-tung, “Mao Tse-tung's Tribute to Stalin”, in Current Soviet Policies[9], New York: Frederick A. Praeger, →ISSN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 254:
        Following the doctrine of Lenin and Stalin, relying on the support of the great Soviet state and all the revolutionary forces of all countries, the Chinese Communist Party and the Chinese people gained an historic victory a few years ago.
      • 1972 May 28, 3:30 from the start, in President Nixon addresses the Soviet People live from the Kremlin[10], spoken by Richard Nixon, archived from the original on 22 December 2015:
        We have agreed on joint ventures in space. We have agreed on ways of working together to protect the environment, to advance health, to cooperate in science and technology. We have agreed on means of preventing incidents at sea. We have established a commission to expand trade between our two nations. Most important, we have taken an historic first step in the limitation of nuclear strategic arms.
      • 2022 June 29, David Pakman, 0:00 from the start, in Trump Assaulted Secret Service Agent, Smeared Ketchup on Wall[11], archived from the original on 30 June 2022:
        Well yesterday was an historic day. Uh, there was last minute testimony scheduled in the January 6th committee from a former aide to Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows.
    4. (nonstandard, Britain, West Country) Used before all consonants.
Usage notes edit
  • In standard English, the article an is used before vowel sounds, while a is used before consonant sounds. Alternatively, an can be found before an unstressed syllable beginning with an h-sound, as in an historic. The h may then become silent or is at least very weakly articulated. This usage is favoured by only 6% of British speakers, and is only slightly more common in writing.[1]
  • Historically, an could also be found before one and before many words with initial u, eu (now pronounced with initial /juː/, /jʊ/, /jə/), such as eunuch, unique, and utility. This is because those initial letters were pronounced as vowels. In writing, an remained usual before such words until the 19th century -- long after these words acquired initial consonant sounds in standard English. This is still occasionally seen.[2]
  • In the other direction, a occurs before a vowel, rarely, in nonstandard (often dialectal) speech and in its written representations. Example: "ain't this a innerestin sitchation" (Moira Young, Blood Red Road).
  • The various article senses of a are all senses of an.
Translations edit

Numeral edit

an

  1. (nonstandard, Britain, West Country) one

References edit

  1. ^ Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage (2015, →ISBN, page 2: "Before words beginning with h [...] the standard modern approach is to use a (never an) together with an aspirated h [...], but not to demur if others use an with minimal or nil aspiration given to the following h (an historic /әn (h)ɪsˈtɒrɪk/, an horrific /әn (h)ɒˈrɪfɪk/, etc.)." Fowler's goes on to source the 6% figure to Wells (third edition, 2008).
  2. ^ a, adj.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2008.

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English an (and, if).

Conjunction edit

an

  1. (archaic) If
  2. (archaic) So long as.
    An it harm none, do what ye will.
  3. (archaic) As if; as though.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from Georgian ან (an).

Noun edit

an (plural ans)

  1. The first letter of the Georgian alphabet, (Mkhedruli), (Asomtavruli) or (Nuskhuri).

Etymology 4 edit

From the Old English an, on (preposition).

Preposition edit

an

  1. In each; to or for each; per.
    I was only going twenty miles an hour.
Usage notes edit
  • This is the same as the word a in such contexts, modified because of preceding a vowel sound (after an unpronounced h). The train was speeding along at a mile a minute.
Synonyms edit
Translations edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. (Western Cape) Alternative form of aan

Ainu edit

Etymology edit

Similar to Japanese ある (aru).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

an (Kana spelling アン)

  1. (intransitive, copulative) to exist, be (somewhere); there is
    Aynu an ruwe ne.
    There is an Ainu.

See also edit

  • ne (to be)

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

Possibly a metaphorical use of anë (vessel).

Noun edit

an m (definite ani)

  1. (anatomy) womb, caul
    Synonym: mitër
  2. (anatomy) joint
  3. (dialectal) room, vessel
  4. (dialectal, Arbëresh) ship

Related terms edit

Arin edit

Noun edit

an

  1. haunch

Aromanian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus. Compare Romanian an.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

an n (plural anj or enj)

  1. year

Related terms edit

Azerbaijani edit

Etymology edit

From Arabicآن(ʔān).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

an (definite accusative anı, plural anlar)

  1. moment

Declension edit

    Declension of an
singular plural
nominative an
anlar
definite accusative anı
anları
dative ana
anlara
locative anda
anlarda
ablative andan
anlardan
definite genitive anın
anların
    Possessive forms of an
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) anım anlarım
sənin (your) anın anların
onun (his/her/its) anı anları
bizim (our) anımız anlarımız
sizin (your) anınız anlarınız
onların (their) anı or anları anları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) anımı anlarımı
sənin (your) anını anlarını
onun (his/her/its) anını anlarını
bizim (our) anımızı anlarımızı
sizin (your) anınızı anlarınızı
onların (their) anını or anlarını anlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) anıma anlarıma
sənin (your) anına anlarına
onun (his/her/its) anına anlarına
bizim (our) anımıza anlarımıza
sizin (your) anınıza anlarınıza
onların (their) anına or anlarına anlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) anımda anlarımda
sənin (your) anında anlarında
onun (his/her/its) anında anlarında
bizim (our) anımızda anlarımızda
sizin (your) anınızda anlarınızda
onların (their) anında or anlarında anlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) anımdan anlarımdan
sənin (your) anından anlarından
onun (his/her/its) anından anlarından
bizim (our) anımızdan anlarımızdan
sizin (your) anınızdan anlarınızdan
onların (their) anından or anlarından anlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) anımın anlarımın
sənin (your) anının anlarının
onun (his/her/its) anının anlarının
bizim (our) anımızın anlarımızın
sizin (your) anınızın anlarınızın
onların (their) anının or anlarının anlarının

Derived terms edit

Bambara edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

an

  1. we

Bikol Central edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Central Philippine *aŋ. Cognate with Cebuano ang, Hiligaynon ang, Tagalog ang, Waray-Waray an.

Further etymology is debated; some have theorized a relationship to Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *a (direct marker), from Proto-Austronesian *a (direct marker) with the addition of an unclear nasal suffix. Compare Kapampangan ing.

Particle edit

an (Basahan spelling ᜀᜈ᜔)

  1. direct marker for all general nouns other than personal proper nouns
    Nagdalagan an lalaki pasiring sa baybayon.
    The man ran towards the shore.
    Kinakan kan ikos an sira. (Naga)
    Kinaon kan ikos an sira. (Legazpi)
    The cat ate the fish.
Usage notes edit
  • This particle is analyzed as the definite article (i.e., the) when used alone, and the indefinite article (i.e., a or an) when used with the numeral "saro".
    An saldang. (Naga)
    An aldaw. (Legazpi)
    The sun.
    An sarong tawo.
    A person.
  • Specific nouns are marked with "si" or "su".
  • Direct personal proper nouns (primarily names) are marked with "si".

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

'an (Basahan spelling ᜀᜈ᜔)

  1. Clipping of iyan.

Bourguignon edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin in.

Preposition edit

an

  1. in
Synonyms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Latin inde.

Pronoun edit

an

  1. used to indicate an indefinite quantity, of it, of them
    J'an veus deus
    I want two of them
    J'an seus seur
    I am sure of it

Breton edit

Alternative forms edit

Article edit

an

  1. the

Chuukese edit

Determiner edit

an

  1. third person singular possessive; his, hers, its (used with general-class objects)

Related terms edit

Noun edit

an

  1. path, road

Cimbrian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • a (Luserna)

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ein, from Old High German ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz. Cognate with German ein, Dutch een, English one, Icelandic einn.

Article edit

an

  1. (Sette Comuni) a, an
    an gamègalndar manna married man
  2. (Luserna) oblique masculine of a
    I hån an pruadar un a sbestar.I have a brother and a sister.

Declension edit

Cimbrian indefinite articles (Sette Comuni dialect)
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative an an an
Accusative an an an
Dative aname anara aname

Derived terms edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. (Sette Comuni) that (introduces a subordinate clause)
    Khömme an dar sbaighe.
    Tell him that he needs to shut up.

References edit

  • “an” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Luserna / Lusérn: Le nostre parole / Ünsarne börtar / Unsere Wörter [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Cornish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *sindos.

Article edit

an

  1. the (definite article)

Crimean Tatar edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Arabicآن(ʔān).

Noun edit

an

  1. moment

Declension edit

References edit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[12], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech an. By surface analysis, univerbation of a +‎ on.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

an

  1. (relative, archaic) which, who, as
    Synonyms: který, jenž, jak, když
    Bělá se tam, bělá žena, ana malé dítě nese.A white form can be seen there, a white woman who is carrying a child.
    Vidíš-li poutníka, an dlouhou lučinou spěchá ku cíli, než červánky pohynou?Do you see a traveller hastening ere the twilight passes away across the long meadows towards a destination?

Declension edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. (archaic) when, while
    An tak mluvili, ruce se jim chvěly.As they were speaking, their hands quivered.
  2. (archaic) because
    Ulehčilo se mi, an jsem byla uspokojena, že sama trpím.I was relieved, for it satisfied me that I myself do suffer.

Further reading edit

  • an in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • an in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German an and German an, from Proto-Germanic *ana (on, at), cognate with English on and doublet of Danish å, Danish .

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

an

  1. on (only used in lexicalized expressions)

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

an

  1. imperative of ane

Egyptian edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of ꜥn.

Elfdalian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hann. Cognate with Swedish han.

Pronoun edit

an m

  1. he

Emilian edit

 
Emiliano-Romagnolo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eml

Etymology edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m

  1. year

Fordata edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kaən, from Proto-Austronesian *kaən.

Verb edit

an

  1. to eat

References edit

  • Drabbe, Peter (1932). Woordenboek der Fordaatsche Taal. Bandoeng: A.C. Nix & Co., p. 9.

Franco-Provençal edit

Noun edit

an m

  1. year
    Synonym: annâ

French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French, from Latin annus, from Proto-Italic *atnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂et-no-, probably from *h₂et- (to go).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural agns)

  1. year

Fula edit

Etymology 1 edit

Determiner edit

an (singular)

  1. (possessive) Alternative form of am (my).
Usage notes edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

an

  1. second person singular emphatic pronoun you
Usage notes edit

Dialectal variants edit

References edit

Fuyug edit

Noun edit

an (plural aning)

  1. man

References edit

  • Robert L. Bradshaw, Fuyug grammar sketch (2007)

German edit

Etymology edit

From Old High German ana.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an (+ dative)

  1. (local) on; upon; at; in; against
    Das Bild hängt an der Wand.The picture hangs on the wall.
  2. by; near; close to; next to
  3. (temporal, with days or times of day) on; in; at
    Wir treffen uns am (an dem) Dienstag.
    We're meeting on Tuesday.
    Ich werde sie am (an dem) Abend sehen.
    I will see her in the evening.
  4. (temporal) a; per; only used with the word Tag (day), otherwise use in
    zweimal am Tagtwice a day

Preposition edit

an (+ accusative)

  1. on; onto
    Ich hänge das Bild an die Wand.I hang the picture on the wall.
  2. at; against
    Schauen Sie an die Tafel.Look at the blackboard.
  3. to; for
    Ein Brief an Anna.A letter for Anna.

Preposition edit

an (+ dative or accusative)

  1. (any relation to an object or attribute regardless of time and space) of, on, in, for, about
    an einem Roman schreibento write on a novel
    Mangel an Lebensmittelnlack of food
    Alle Menschen sind frei und gleich an Würde und Rechten geborenAll human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.
    Er ist schuld an dem UnglückHe is responsible for the misfortune
    Das mag ich nicht an ihmI don't like that about him

Usage notes edit

  • Usually used to refer to something being on a vertical surface, as opposed to auf, which usually points to a horizontal surface.
  • When followed by the masculine/neuter definite article in the dative case (i.e. dem (the)), the two words generally contract to am (on the) if not emphasized.
  • When followed by the neuter definite article in the accusative case (i.e. das (the)), the two words generally contract to ans (on the) if not emphasized.

Adverb edit

an

  1. onward; on
    von heute anfrom today on

Adjective edit

an (strong nominative masculine singular aner, not comparable)

  1. (predicative) on
    Synonyms: angeschaltet, ein, eingeschaltet
    Antonyms: aus, ausgeschaltet
    Ist der Schalter an oder aus? [= Ist der Schalter an- oder ausgeschaltet?]
    Is the switch on or off. [Is the switch switched on or off.]

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Girawa edit

Noun edit

an

  1. water

Further reading edit

  • Patricia Lillie, Girawa Dictionary

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌽

Haitian Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French un.

Article edit

an

  1. the (definite article)
Usage notes edit

Use this word when:

  • It modifies a singular noun, and
  • It is preceded by a word that ends with either:
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French an (year).

Noun edit

an

  1. year
Synonyms edit

Ido edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English onGerman an. Decision no. 759, Progreso V.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. at, on (indicates contiguity, juxtaposition)
    Me pendis pikturi an la parieto.I hung paintings on the wall.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Progreso IV (in Ido), 1911–1912, pages 409, 523, 591, 622
  • Progreso V (in Ido), 1912–1913, page 659

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish in, from Proto-Celtic *sindos.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ənˠ/, (between consonants) /ə/, (before a/á, o/ó, u/ú) /ə.n̪ˠ-/, (before e/é, i/í) /ə.n̠ʲ-/

Article edit

an

  1. the
    an t-uiscethe water
    an bheanthe woman
    an pháisteof the child
    ag an gcailín/chailínat the girl
Declension edit
Case Masculine singular Feminine singular Plural
Nominative anT anL naH
Genitive anL naH naE
Dative anD anD naH
D: Triggers lenition after de, do, and i (except of d, t), no mutation with idir, and eclipsis otherwise (varies by dialect);
s lenites to ts; s always lenites with feminine nouns, even with prepositions that normally trigger eclipsis, but does
not lenite at all with masculine nouns
E: Triggers eclipsis
H: Triggers h-prothesis
L: Triggers lenition (except of d, t; s lenites to ts)
T: Triggers t-prothesis

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish in.

Pronunciation edit

  • (preverbal particle): IPA(key): (before a consonant) /ə/, (before a/á, o/ó, u/ú) /ə.nˠ-/, (before e/é, i/í) /ə.n̠ʲ-/
  • (copular particle): IPA(key): /ənˠ/, (before é, ea, í, iad) /ə.n̠ʲ-/

Particle edit

an (triggers eclipsis; takes the dependent form of irregular verbs if available; not used in the past tense except of some irregular verbs)

  1. Used to form direct and indirect questions
    An bhfuil tú ag éisteacht?Are you listening?
    Níl a fhios agam an bhfuil sé anseo.I don’t know if/whether he is here.
Related terms edit
  • ar (used with the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

Particle edit

an

  1. used to introduce copular questions, both direct and indirect, in the present/future tense
    An maith leat bainne?Do you like milk?
    Níl a fhios agam an é Conchúr a chonaic mé.I don’t know if it’s Connor whom I saw.
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

an (present analytic anann, future analytic anfaidh, verbal noun anacht, past participle anta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of fan (stay, wait, remain)
Conjugation edit

Etymology 4 edit

Particle edit

an

  1. Alternative form of a (used before numbers when counting)

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
an n-an han not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あん

Juǀ'hoan edit

Pronunciation edit

  • The nasal vowel IPA(key): /ã/

Letter edit

an (upper case An)

  1. A letter of the Juǀ'hoan alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Kunigami edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あん

Ladin edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural ani)

  1. year

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *an, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂en. Cognate with Lithuanian angu (or), Gothic 𐌰𐌽 (an, so? now?). May also be related to Ancient Greek ἄν (án, particle), Sanskrit अना (anā́), Avestan𐬀𐬥𐬁(anā), Lithuanian anàs, Albanian a, Proto-Slavic *onъ.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. or, or whether (A conjunction that introduces the second part of a disjunctive interrogation, or a phrase implying doubt.)
    1. in disjunctive interrogations
      1. direct
        1. (introduced by utrum (whether))
        2. (introduced by -ne (interrogative enclitic))
        3. (introduced by nonne ([is it] not))
        4. (introduced by num (interrogative particle))
        5. (without an introductory particle)
      2. indirect
        1. (introduced by utrum (whether))
        2. (introduced by -ne, interrogative enclitic)
        3. (introduced by an)
        4. (without an introductory particle)
      3. or rather, or on the contrary (where the opinion of the speaker or the probability inclines to the second interrogative clause, and this is made emphatic, as a corrective of the former)
        1. hence, in the comic poets, as an potius
      4. or, or rather, or indeed, or perhaps (where, as is frequent, the first part of the interrogation is not expressed, but is to be supplied from the context, an begins the interrogation, but it does not begin an absolute – i.e., non-disjunctive – interrogation)
      5. (in the phrase an nōn) or not
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
      6. (in the phrase an ne) pleonastic usage for an
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
    2. (in disjunctive clauses that express doubt) or
      1. ?
      2. denoting uncertainty by itself, without a verb of doubting
      3. (chiefly in and after the Augustean period) standing for sīve
      4. where the first disjunctive clause is to be supplied from the general idea or where an stands for utrum or necne
      5. Since in such distributive sentences expressive of doubt, the opinion of the speaker or the probability usually inclines to the second, i.e. to the clause beginning with an, the expressions haud sciō an, nesciō an, and dubitō an incline to an affirmative signification, “I almost know”, “I am inclined to think”, “I almost think”, “I might say”, “I might assert that”, etc., for “perhaps”, “probably”.
      6. Sometimes the distributive clause beginning with an designates directly the opposite, the more improbable, the negative; in which case nesciō an, haud sciō an, etc., like the English I know not whether, signify “I think that not”, “I believe that not”, etc.

Usage notes edit

  • Used with utrum (whether) in the construction utrum...an (whether...or):
    Nescio quid intersit, utrum nunc veniam, an ad decem annos.
    I know not what matter it is, whether I come now or after ten years.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • ăn in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • an in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[14], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to offer a person the alternative of... or..: optionem alicui dare, utrum...an
    • it is a debated point whether... or..: in contentione ponitur, utrum...an
    • it is a difficult point, disputed question: magna quaestio est (followed by an indirect question)
    • to keep, celebrate a festival: diem festum agere (of an individual)
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[1], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Loniu edit

Noun edit

an

  1. fresh water

References edit

  • Malcolm Ross, Andrew Pawley, Meredith Osmond, The Lexicon of Proto-Oceanic →ISBN, 2007)
  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary (as ʔan)

Low German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Low German an, from Old Saxon an, ana, from Proto-Germanic *an, *ana.

Pronunciation edit

  • Rhymes: -an
  • IPA(key): /an/, /aːn/, /ɒːn/, /ɔːn/

Preposition edit

an

  1. on
  2. to, at

Inflection edit

Neither the spelling nor grammar of these forms applies to all, or even necessarily the majority, of dialects.

Adverb edit

an

  1. on

See also edit

Luxembourgish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old High German indi.

Conjunction edit

an

  1. and

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *in.

Preposition edit

an

  1. in

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of án.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of ǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of àn.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. Alternative form of āne

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /a(n)/ (see usage notes)

Etymology 1 edit

An unstressed form of oon (one), from the occasional use of Old English ān (one) as an article.

Article edit

an

  1. a, an (indefinite article):
    1. Any example or instance of a thing.
    2. A certain or particular thing.
    3. Any, every; several or all instances of a thing.
  2. Used in conjunction with numerals (especially hundred, thousend)
Usage notes edit
  • In later non-Northern Middle English, a is usually found before vowels and /h/, while an is usually found preceding other consonants. However, an often occurs before any consonant in earlier Middle English.
  • In early Middle English, the indefinite article is often omitted; occasional omission persists into later Middle English.
  • Inflected forms of the indefinite article are sometimes found in early Middle English; see the inflection table below.
Declension edit
Descendants edit
  • English: an, a
  • Scots: a
  • Yola: a, e
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. Alternative form of in

Etymology 3 edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. Alternative form of and

Etymology 4 edit

Numeral edit

an

  1. Alternative form of oon

Etymology 5 edit

Verb edit

an

  1. Alternative form of haven

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French an, from Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Descendants edit

  • French: an

Middle Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

an

  1. Alternative form of yn

Mirandese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin in.

Preposition edit

an

  1. in
  2. on

Mòcheno edit

Article edit

an

  1. oblique masculine of a

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French an, from Latin annus.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. (Guernsey, Jersey) year

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Northern Kurdish edit

Etymology edit

Confer Persianیا().

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an (Arabic spellingئان⁩)

  1. or
    Synonym: (after a word ending in a vowel) yan

References edit

  • Chyet, Michael L. (2020), “an”, in Ferhenga Birûskî: Kurmanji–English Dictionary (Language Series; 2), volume 2, London: Transnational Press, page 8

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

an

  1. imperative of ane

Anagrams edit

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Occitan an, from Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. year
Usage notes edit
  • Also used with the verb aver (to have) to indicate age

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

an

  1. third-person plural present indicative of aver

Okinawan edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あん

Old Czech edit

Etymology edit

Univerbation of a +‎ on.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. connects clauses; and that/he
  2. connects contrastive clauses; but that/he
  3. introduces a temporal clause of recency; as he just (was)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Old English edit

Old English numbers (edit)
10
1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: ān
    Ordinal: forma
    Adverbial: ǣne
    Multiplier: ānfeald

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ān, Old Saxon ēn, Old High German ein, Old Norse einn, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (ains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin ūnus, Ancient Greek οἶος (oîos), Old Irish oen.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

ān

  1. one
    • c. 973, Æthelwold's translation of the Rule of Saint Benedict, quoting Galatians 3:28
      Ġe þēo ġe frēo, eall wē sind on Criste ān.
      Slave or free, we are all one in Christ.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Mark 14:37
      Þā cōm hē and fand hīe slǣpende, and cwæþ tō Petre, "Simon, slǣpst þū? Ne meahtest þū āne tīd wacian?"
      Then he came and found them asleep, and said to Peter, "Simon, are you asleep? Couldn't you stay awake for one hour?"
    • early 12th century, the Peterborough Chronicle, year 1100
      On morgen æfter Hlāfmæssedæġe wearþ sē cyning Willelm on huntoþe fram his ānum menn mid āne flāne ofsċoten.
      On the morning after Lammas day, King William was out hunting when he was shot with an arrow by one of his servants.

Declension edit

Article edit

ān

  1. a; an (indefinite article)

Adjective edit

ān

  1. only
    Ne bēoþ wē ġeboren ūs selfum ānum.
    We aren't born for ourselves alone.
    Mæġ man sprecan be rīmum ġif þing ān sind?
    Can we speak of numbers if there are only things?
    • 11th century, Durham Proverbs, no. 22
      Earg mæġ þæt ān þæt hē him ondrǣde.
      A coward can only do one thing: fear.
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English
      Āne twā word sind þǣre fēorðan ġeþīednesse: eō ("iċ gange"), īs ("þū gǣst"); queō ("iċ mæġ"), quīs ("þū meaht").
      Only two words follow the fourth declension: eo ("I go"), is ("you go"); queo ("I can"), quis ("you can").
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, John 5:18
      Þæs þe mā þā Iudēiscan sōhton hine tō ofslēanne, næs nā for þon āne þe hē þone ræstedæġ bræc, ac for þon þe hē cwæþ þæt God wǣre his fæder, and hine selfne dyde Gode ġelīcne.
      That made the Jews try even harder to kill him, not just for breaking the Sabbath, but for saying God was his father, and making himself equal to God.
    • c. 1000, "The Battle of Maldon", lines 94-95
      God āna wāt hwā þǣre wælstōwe wealdan mōte.
      Only God knows who is destined to control the battlefield.
    • "The Fortunes of Men", lines 8-9
      God āna wāt hwæt him weaxendum wintra bringaþ.
      God only knows what the years will bring to the growing child.
  2. alone
    Neart þū ġenōg eald þæt þū āna on sund gā.
    You're not old enough to go swimming by yourself.
    Iċ slǣpe āna.
    I sleep alone.

Usage notes edit

In the above senses ("only" and "alone"), this word was often used in the weak declension, often indeclinably as āna.

Declension edit

Noun edit

ān n

  1. one (digit or figure)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an oblique singularm (oblique plural anz, nominative singular anz, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: an
    • French: an
  • Norman: an

Old Frisian edit

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

ān

  1. Alternative form of ēn

References edit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

an (triggers eclipsis, takes a leniting relative clause)

  1. Alternative form of a
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 112b13
      Is demniu liunn a n-ad·chiam hua sulib ol·daas an ro·chluinemmar hua chluasaib.
      What we see with the eyes is more certain for us than what we hear with the ears.

Verb edit

·an

  1. third-person singular preterite conjunct of anaid

Verb edit

an

  1. second-person singular imperative of anaid

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
an unchanged n-an
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Norse edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *þan, possibly through *þannai, whence cognate with Old English þonne (than). For similar loss of þ- compare at from earlier Proto-Norse ᚦᚨᛏ (þat), ᚦᛡᛏ (þᴀt).

Conjunction edit

an

  1. than

Descendants edit

  • Old Norse: en
    • Icelandic: en
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: enn
    • Norwegian Bokmål: enn
    • Old Swedish: æn
    • Danish: end

Old Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus (year).

Noun edit

an m (oblique plural ans, nominative singular ans, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Descendants edit

  • Occitan: an

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Univerbation of a +‎ on.[1] First attested in 1388.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. connects clauses; and that
  2. connects contrastive clauses; but that
  3. introduces a temporal clause of recency; as it just (was)

References edit

  1. ^ J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1900), “an”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 1, Warsaw, page 33

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *an.

Preposition edit

an

  1. on, in

Proto-Norse edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Romanization of ᚨᚾ

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin annus (year), from Proto-Italic *atnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂et-no-, probably from *h₂et- (to go). Compare Megleno-Romanian an and Aromanian an.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

an m (plural ani or (obsolete) ai)

  1. year

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) onn
  • (Sutsilvan, Vallader) on

Etymology edit

From Latin annus.

Noun edit

an m (plural ans)

  1. (Puter) year

Sardinian edit

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. (Nuorese) Alternative form of a, used before words starting with d-
    • 1896, Egidio Bellorini, “Non temere; io torno e ti sposo”, in Canti popolari amorosi raccolti a Nuoro, Bergamo, section 153, page 79, lines 1–4:
      Sette calonicheḍḍos
      Falan a Ffiniscole
      A ffacher ẓibbileu
      An dommo de una monẓa.
      Seven priests go down to Siniscola, to have a jubilee at a nun's house.

References edit

  • Wagner, Max Leopold (1960–1964), “a2”, in Dizionario etimologico sardo, Heidelberg

Saterland Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian an, from Proto-West Germanic *an, from Proto-Germanic *an. Cognates include West Frisian oan and German an.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

an (neuter or distal adverb deeran, proximal adverb hieran, interrogative adverb wieran)

  1. on
    Mien Jasse honget an dän Hoake.My jacket is hanging on the hook.
  2. at
    Iek sitte an dän Disk.I'm sitting at the table.
  3. next to
    Iek sitte an mien Suster.I'm sitting next to my sister.
  4. towards, to
    Dät Boot is an Lound kemen.The boat came ashore (literally, “The boat has come to land.”)
  5. of, from
    Mien Bääsje is an Kanker stúurven.My grandmother died of cancer.
  6. about, circa
    Iek häbe an do fjautig Ljudene blouked.I have seen about forty people.

Adjective edit

an

  1. on, switched on, burning
    Dät Fjúur is an.The fire is burning.
    Ju Laampe is an.The lamp is switched on.

References edit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “an”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scots edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English and, ond, end (and), from Proto-Germanic *andi, *anþi, *undi, *unþi (and, furthermore), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti (facing opposite, near, in front of, before).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. and
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English oon, from Old English ān (one), from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Cognate to English an.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

an

  1. (before a vowel) a, an
Usage notes edit
  • In colloquial usage mostly replaced by a. However, still widely used in literature, probably due to English influence. [1]
Synonyms edit

References edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /an/, /ən/
  • Hyphenation: an

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish in. Cognates include Irish an and Manx yn.

Article edit

an

  1. the
Declension edit
Variation of an (definite article)
Masculine Feminine Plural
nom. dat. gen. nom. dat. gen. nom. dat. gen.
+ f- am anL anL na na nam
+ m-, p- or b- am a'L a'L na na nam
+ c- or g- an a'L a'L na na nan
+ sV-, sl-, sn- or sr- an anT anT na na nan
+ other consonant an an an na na nan
+ vowel anT an an naH naH nan
L Triggers lenition; H Triggers H-prothesis; T Triggers T-prothesis

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish a. Cognates include Irish a.

Determiner edit

an

  1. their
See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Irish i. Cognates include Irish i and Manx ayns.

Preposition edit

an (+ dative, no mutation)

  1. in
Usage notes edit
  • This form is not used before nouns beginning with b, f, m or p, where am and ann am are used instead.
Inflection edit
Personal inflection of an
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st annam annamsa
2nd annad annadsa
3rd m ann annsan
3rd f innte inntese
Plural 1st annainn annainne
2nd annaibh annaibhse
3rd annta anntasan
Synonyms edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Old Irish in. Cognates include Irish an.

Particle edit

an

  1. Used together with a dependent form of a verb to form the interrogative.
Usage notes edit
  • Before verbs beginning with b, f, m or p, the form am is used. Before bheil (am, is, are), the form a is also used.

Verb edit

an

  1. Present interrogative form of is (the copula).
Usage notes edit
  • Before words beginning with b, f, m or p, the form am is used.
Inflection edit

References edit

Siraya edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Austronesian *-an.

Noun edit

an

  1. place

Southwestern Dinka edit

Pronoun edit

an

  1. I

References edit

  • Dinka-English Dictionary[15], 2005

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

an

  1. Romanization of 𒀭 (an)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German an and German an, and less commonly from English on, from Proto-Germanic *ana (on, at), cognate with English on and doublet of Swedish å, Swedish .

Adverb edit

an

  1. used as a verb particle, similar to German preposition an (at, in, on, to)

Related terms edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. (accounting) to

Anagrams edit

Tày edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Chinese (ān).

Adjective edit

an ()

  1. peaceful; undisturbed
    dú bấu annot to live peacefully
    神符法主禁㐌
    Thần phù phép chúa cổm đạ an
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

an

  1. to manage to do something; to fend for oneself
    an ý ngòito manage to see

References edit

  • Hoàng Văn Ma; Lục Văn Pảo; Hoàng Chí (2006) Từ điển Tày-Nùng-Việt [Tay-Nung-Vietnamese dictionary] (in Vietnamese), Hanoi: Nhà xuất bản Từ điển Bách khoa Hà Nội
  • Lương Bèn (2011) Từ điển Tày-Việt [Tay-Vietnamese dictionary]‎[16][17] (in Vietnamese), Thái Nguyên: Nhà Xuất bản Đại học Thái Nguyên
  • Lục Văn Pảo; Hoàng Tuấn Nam (2003), Hoàng Triều Ân, editor, Từ điển chữ Nôm Tày [A Dictionary of (chữ) Nôm Tày]‎[18] (in Vietnamese), Hanoi: Nhà xuất bản Khoa học Xã hội

Tedim Chin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔan (vegetables), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *h(y)an.

Noun edit

an

  1. food

References edit

  • Zomi Ordbog based on the work of D.L. Haokip

Torres Strait Creole edit

Etymology edit

From English hand.

Noun edit

an

  1. hand, lower arm
  2. flipper

Turkish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ottoman Turkishآن(an), from Arabicآن(ʔān).

Noun edit

an (definite accusative anı, plural anlar)

  1. moment
    • 1939 February 14, “Acaba İspanyada Krallık iade edilecek mi!”, in Aydin, page 1:
      İnglitere Fransa ile Frankoyu tanımak üzeredir. Bu kararı iki hükümet bir anda ilan edecektir.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
Declension edit
Inflection
Nominative an
Definite accusative anı
Singular Plural
Nominative an anlar
Definite accusative anı anları
Dative ana anlara
Locative anda anlarda
Ablative andan anlardan
Genitive anın anların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular anım anlarım
2nd singular anın anların
3rd singular anı anları
1st plural anımız anlarımız
2nd plural anınız anlarınız
3rd plural anları anları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular anımı anlarımı
2nd singular anını anlarını
3rd singular anını anlarını
1st plural anımızı anlarımızı
2nd plural anınızı anlarınızı
3rd plural anlarını anlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular anıma anlarıma
2nd singular anına anlarına
3rd singular anına anlarına
1st plural anımıza anlarımıza
2nd plural anınıza anlarınıza
3rd plural anlarına anlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular anımda anlarımda
2nd singular anında anlarında
3rd singular anında anlarında
1st plural anımızda anlarımızda
2nd plural anınızda anlarınızda
3rd plural anlarında anlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular anımdan anlarımdan
2nd singular anından anlarından
3rd singular anından anlarından
1st plural anımızdan anlarımızdan
2nd plural anınızdan anlarınızdan
3rd plural anlarından anlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular anımın anlarımın
2nd singular anının anlarının
3rd singular anının anlarının
1st plural anımızın anlarımızın
2nd plural anınızın anlarınızın
3rd plural anlarının anlarının
See also edit

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

an

  1. second-person singular imperative of anmak

Vietnamese edit

Etymology edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from (tranquil). The character can also be read as yên.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

an

  1. (only in compounds) safe, secure

Derived terms edit

Derived terms

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Vilamovian edit

Vilamovian cardinal numbers
1 2  > 
    Cardinal : an

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. and

Related terms edit

Numeral edit

ān

  1. one

Related terms edit

Waray-Waray edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Central Philippine *aŋ. Cognate with Cebuano ang, Hiligaynon ang, Tagalog ang, Bikol Central an.

Further etymology is debated; some have theorized a relationship to Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *a (direct marker), from Proto-Austronesian *a (direct marker) with the addition of an unclear nasal suffix. Compare Kapampangan ing.

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

an

  1. direct marker for all general nouns other than personal proper nouns
    Midalagan an lalaki paingon ha baybayon.
    The man ran towards the shore.
    Gikaon han iring an isda.
    The cat ate the fish.

Usage notes edit

  • This particle is analyzed as the definite article (i.e., the) when used alone, and the indefinite article (i.e., a or an) when used with the numeral "usa" plus "ka" that quantifies an object/object that it modifies.
    An adlaw.
    The sun.
    An usa ka tawo.
    A person.
  • Specific nouns are marked with "si".
  • Direct personal proper nouns (primarily names) are marked with "si".

Yola edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English an, from Old English and, ond, end, from Proto-Germanic *andi, *anþi.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

an

  1. and
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 31:
      Coardhed an recoardhed.
      Searched and researched.

Etymology 2 edit

Preposition edit

an

  1. Alternative form of on
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 1, page 84:
      an a milagh,
      on the clover,

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

Yoruba edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

an

  1. him, her, it (third-person singular non-honorific object pronoun following a monosyllabic verb with a high-tone /ã/)

Pronoun edit

án

  1. him, her, it (third-person singular non-honorific object pronoun following a monosyllabic verb with a low- or mid-tone /ã/)

See also edit