Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 16:25

abrogation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1535. From Middle French abrogation, from Latin abrogātiō (repealed), from abrogo, from ab (from) + rogo (ask, inquire).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abrogation (plural abrogations)

  1. The act of abrogating; a repeal by authority; abolition. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][1]
    • 1853, Herman Melville, Herman, Bartleby, the Scrivener, quoted in Billy Budd, Sailor and Other Stories, New York: Penguin Books, ISBN 0 14 60.0012 9, published 1968; reprint 1995 as Bartleby, page 2:
      [] I consider the sudden and violent abrogation of the office of Master in Chancery, by the new Constitution, as a __ premature act; inasmuch as I had counted on a life-lease of the profits, whereas I only received those of a few short years.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 8

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abrogation f (plural abrogations)

  1. abrogation

External linksEdit