EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abs

Abbreviation of abdominal muscles.

NounEdit

ab (plural abs)

  1. (informal) abdominal muscle. [Mid 20th century.][1]
    • 2006, H. Peter Steeves, The Things Themselves (page 75)
      The bikinied models in most of the ESPN2 shows have abs. Many of the malnourished bikinied models in the commercials have visible rib cages. How did the two get conflated into a shared vision of beauty?
    • 2010, Bill Geiger, "6-pack Abs in 9 Weeks", Reps! 17:106
      When possible, do your ab workout on a day when you're not training a major muscle group [] .
Usage notesEdit

Most often used attributively. Substantive use is more common in the plural form abs.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of abscess.

NounEdit

ab (plural abs)

  1. (slang) An abscess caused by injecting an illegal drug, usually heroin.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviations, see definitions.

AbbreviationEdit

ab

  1. abort or abortion
  2. about

Etymology 4Edit

From the spelling books and the fact that it was the first of the letter combinations.[2]

NounEdit

ab (plural abs)

  1. (US) The early stages of; the beginning process; the start.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 2
  2. ^ Mathews, Mitford M, ed. A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles. 1st. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1956.
  • ab” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • "ab" in Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 2002.
  • ab” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

AnagramsEdit


AynuEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Persian آب (āb).

NounEdit

ab

  1. water

CatalanEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. (archaic) amb (with)

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ab (of, from).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. ex (out of, sold from)
  2. from (with the origin in time)

Etymology 2Edit

See abe (to ape, mimic).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aːb/, [æːˀb̥]

VerbEdit

ab

  1. Imperative of abe.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ab, from Proto-Germanic *ab.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Standard German) IPA(key): /ap/, [ʔäpʰ]
  • (Switzerland) IPA(key): /ab̥/

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. Beginning at that time or location; from.
    ab heute verfügbar (available from today on)

Derived termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. from

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin abbas (father), from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbas), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

NounEdit

ab m (genitive aba, nominative plural abaí)

  1. (Christianity) abbot
DeclensionEdit
Coordinate termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of the relative particle a and the prevocalic variant of the past/conditional copula particle b’.

ParticleEdit

ab

  1. Alternative form of ba (used in relative clauses before a vowel sound).
    Fear maith ab ea é. — He was a good man.
    buachaill ab áirde ná mo dheartháir — A boy (who was) taller than my brother
Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ab n-ab hab t-ab
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂epo (off, away) (English off, of).

Alternative formsEdit

  • ā (not used before a vowel or h)

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. of, from, by, since (takes object in ablative case).

Usage notesEdit

  • Used in conjunction with passive verbs to mark the agent, e.g. Liber ā discipulō aperītur ("the book is opened by the student").

ReferencesEdit

  • Latin Dictionary, Lewis and Short, 1879.
  • Lingua Latina, Hans H. Ørberg, 2005.

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Estonian abi (help).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ab

  1. help
    abbõ andõ – to help (lit. "to give help")
  2. (anatomy) shoulder
    pǟ um abūd vaisõ sizzõl viedtõdrecoiled, flinched (lit. "head is drawn in shoulders")

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

LEL also features a partitive plural form with -īdi as in the example abīdi nustõ "to shrug."


OccitanEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. (Guardiol) with

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ab.

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. of

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reduced form of Latin apud

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. with

DescendantsEdit


PumpokolEdit

NounEdit

ab

  1. father

RomaniEdit

NounEdit

ab m (plural ab)

  1. river

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

ab m (genitive aba, plural abachan)

  1. Alternative form of aba.

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Persian آب (āb).

NounEdit

ab

  1. (archaic) water

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German aber ("but").

ConjunctionEdit

ab

  1. but
Last modified on 26 March 2014, at 21:06