adventitious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin adventicius (foreign), from adveniō (arrive).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌæd.vənˈtɪʃ.əs/, /ˌæd.vɛnˈtɪʃ.əs/
(file)

AdjectiveEdit

adventitious (comparative more adventitious, superlative most adventitious)

  1. From an external source; not innate or inherent, foreign.
  2. Accidental, additional, appearing casually.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 30:
      The adventitious disappearance of those nearer the the throne than the duke had, moreover, set tongues awagging.
  3. (genetics, medicine) Not congenital; acquired.
  4. (biology) Developing in an unusual place or from an unusual source.
    • 1985, R. M. T. Dahlgren, H. T. Clifford, & P. F. Yeo, The Families of the Monocotyledons, page 101
      The Velloziaceae have evolved a woody stem which is covered with a layer of adventitious roots mingled with the fibres of the old leaf sheaths;

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

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Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 08:06