Last modified on 9 April 2015, at 14:21

ager

See also: äger, åger, and Ağer

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager (plural agers)

  1. One who or that which ages something.
  2. (euphemistic) One who is aging; an elderly person.
    • 1965, Richard Hays Williams, Claudine G. Wirths, Lives Through the Years: Styles of Life and Successful Aging, Transaction Publishers (ISBN 9780202367125), page 165
      When the aging person depends on another, the control of the aged one's life space is placed in the hands of another person who may or may not contribute action energy that is appropriate or acceptable from the standpoint of the ager.
    • 2006, Gloria Davenport, Working with Toxic Older Adults: A Guide to Coping with Difficult Elders, Springer Publishing Company (ISBN 9780826117236), page 143
      Inappropriate behavior then erupts from the agers involved, disturbing everyone around, including the agers themselves, who often do not understand what is happening and struggle excessively to maintain rigid control of old perceptions and self images.
    • 2014, Susan H. Mcfadden, Mark Brennan, NEW DIRECTIONS IN THE STUDY OF LATE, Routledge (ISBN 9781134731107), page 62
      This definition of success is located in society's structures and suits society, not the agers. Successful ageing is arguably therefore a socially constructed phenomenon, characterized by lack of “noise,” maintenance of youthful status until death, and a dogged engagement with social structures which appear almost as if designed to discourage the engagement of older people.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse akr, from Proto-Germanic *akraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aːjər/, [ˈæːˀjɐ]

NounEdit

ager c (singular definite ageren, plural indefinite agre)

  1. field
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See age (drive).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aːjər/, [ˈæːjɐ]

VerbEdit

ager

  1. present tense of age

Etymology 3Edit

See agere (act, play).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aɡeːr/, [aˈɡ̥eɐ̯ˀ]

VerbEdit

ager or agér

  1. imperative of agere

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *agros, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀγρός (agrós), Sanskrit अज्र (ájra) and Old English æcer (English acre).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager m (genitive agrī); second declension

  1. field, farm
  2. land, estate, park
  3. territory, country
  4. terrain
  5. soil

InflectionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er (or similar).

Number Singular Plural
nominative ager agrī
genitive agrī agrōrum
dative agrō agrīs
accusative agrum agrōs
ablative agrō agrīs
vocative ager
agre
agrī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin agilis (swift).

AdjectiveEdit

ager 4 nom/acc forms

  1. quick, swift.
  2. smart, cunning, sharp.
  3. (of objects) sharp

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit