agger

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English agger (heap), "pile", from Latin agger (rubble), "mound", "rampart", from ad- + gerere, to carry, to bring

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

agger (plural aggers)

  1. A high tide in which the water rises to a given level, recedes, and then rises again.
  2. A low tide in which the water recedes to a given level, rises, and then recedes again.
  3. In ancient Roman construction, an earthwork; a mound; a raised work.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

agger m (genitive aggeris); third declension

  1. rampart, bulwark (or the materials used to make one)
  2. causeway, pier, dam, dyke

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative agger aggerēs
genitive aggeris aggerum
dative aggerī aggeribus
accusative aggerem aggerēs
ablative aggere aggeribus
vocative agger aggerēs
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 11:58