Last modified on 25 October 2014, at 06:55
See also: Heap

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English heep, from Old English hēap, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz (compare Dutch hoop, Low German Hupen, German Haufen), from Proto-Indo-European *koupos ‘hill’ (compare Lithuanian kaũpas, Albanian qipi ‘stack’, Avestan [script needed] (kaofa))

NounEdit

heap (plural heaps)

  1. A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of people.
    • Francis Bacon
      a heap of vassals and slaves
    • W. Black
      He had heaps of friends.
  2. A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation.
    a heap of earth or stones
    • Dryden
      Huge heaps of slain around the body rise.
  3. A great number or large quantity of things.
    • Bishop Burnet
      a vast heap, both of places of scripture and quotations
    • Robert Louis Stevenson
      I have noticed a heap of things in my life.
  4. (computing) A data structure consisting of trees in which each node is greater than all its children.
  5. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2012 May 9, Jonathan Wilson, “Europa League: Radamel Falcao's Atlético Madrid rout Athletic Bilbao”, the Guardian:
      Every break seemed dangerous and Falcao clearly had the beating of Amorebieta. Others, being forced to stretch a foot behind them to control Arda Turan's 34th-minute cross, might simply have lashed a shot on the turn; Falcao, though, twisted back on to his left foot, leaving Amorebieta in a heap, and thumped in an inevitable finish – his 12th goal in 15 European matches this season.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

heap (third-person singular simple present heaps, present participle heaping, simple past and past participle heaped)

  1. (transitive) To pile in a heap.
    He heaped the laundry upon the bed and began folding.
  2. (transitive) To form or round into a heap, as in measuring.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act I, scene II, verses 40-42
      Cry a reward, to him who shall first bring
      News of that vanished Arabian,
      A full-heap’d helmet of the purest gold.
  3. (transitive) To supply in great quantity.
    They heaped praise upon their newest hero.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *haupaz, whence also Old High German houf. Compare also Old Norse hópr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hēap m

  1. heap

DeclensionEdit


West FrisianEdit

NounEdit

heap c

  1. heap, pile
  2. mass, gang, horde