Last modified on 10 September 2014, at 01:32

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English al-, from Old English eal-, eall- (all-). More at all.

PrefixEdit

al-

  1. (no longer productive) Alternative form of all-.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin al-, variant of ad- used with words starting with L.

PrefixEdit

al-

  1. Variant of ad- used before the letter L.

ReferencesEdit

  • al-” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • al-” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

DutchEdit

PrefixEdit

al-

  1. all-; pan-.



HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *ala

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

al-

  1. sub-, under-
  2. vice, deputy (used with a rank of a person in office)
    elnök (president) → alelnök (vice president)

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Euphonic alteration of ad-, assimilating the D into the initial L of the word the prefix is applied to. See also ac-, af-, ag-, ap-, ar-, as-, at-.

PrefixEdit

al-

  1. Alternative form of ad-.