Last modified on 11 December 2014, at 12:56

astronomical

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since at least 1550, from Middle French astronomique or directly from Latin astronomicus, from Ancient Greek ἀστρονομικός (astronomikós).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

astronomical (comparative more astronomical, superlative most astronomical)

  1. (not comparable) Of or relating to astronomy.
    • 1839, Edgar Allan Poe, The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion,
      Finally, all men saw that astronomical knowledge lied not, and they awaited the comet.
    • 2012 March 1, Brian Hayes, “Pixels or Perish”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 106: 
      Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.
  2. (comparable) Very large; of vast measure.

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