clamber

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

clamber (third-person singular simple present clambers, present participle clambering, simple past and past participle clambered)

  1. To climb with some difficulty, or in a haphazard fashion.
    The children clambered over the jungle gym with reckless abandon.
    • Tennyson
      The narrow street that clambered toward the mill.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Thus, sitting where I was, I lit my candle once more, and then clambered across that great coffin which, for two hours or more, had been a mid-wall of partition between me and danger. But to get out of the niche was harder than to get in; for now that I had a candle to light me, I saw that the coffin, though sound enough to outer view, was wormed through and through, and little better than a rotten shell. So it was that I had some ado to get over it, not daring either to kneel upon it or to bring much weight to bear with my hand, lest it should go through.
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 6
      He would clamber about the roof and windows for hours attempting to discover means of ingress, but to the door he paid little attention, for this was apparently as solid as the walls.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

clamber (plural clambers)

  1. The act of clambering; a difficult or haphazard climb.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of T. Moore to this entry?)
Last modified on 10 March 2014, at 20:15