concave

EnglishEdit

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Top: a spoon with its convex side up.
Bottom: a spoon with its concave side up.
A concave set, with two points x and y for which the connecting line does not lie wholly within the body.

EtymologyEdit

From Old French concave, from Latin concavus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

concave (comparative more concave, superlative most concave)

  1. curved like the inner surface of a sphere or bowl
  2. (set theory, not comparable, of a set) not convex; arranged such that there exist at least two points for which a straight line between these points does not lie wholly within the set.
  3. (functional analysis, not comparable, of a real-valued function on the reals) having an epigraph which is a concave set.
  4. hollow; empty
    • Shakespeare
      as concave [] as a worm-eaten nut

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

concave (plural concaves)

  1. A concave surface or curve.
  2. The vault of the sky.
  3. One of the celestial spheres of the Ptolemaic or geocentric model of the world.
    Aristotle makes [Fire] to move to the concave of the Moon. - Thomas Salusbury (1661).
  4. (manufacturing) An element of a curved grid used to separate desirable material from tailings or chaff in mining and harvesting.
  5. (surfing) An indentation running along the base of a surfboard, intended to increase lift.
  6. (skateboarding) An indented area on the top of a skateboard, providing a position for foot placement and increasing board strength.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

concave (third-person singular simple present concaves, present participle concaving, simple past and past participle concaved)

  1. To render concave, or increase the degree of concavity.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • concaver

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

concave f

  1. Feminine plural form of concavo

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

concave

  1. vocative masculine singular of concavus
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 15:07