Last modified on 18 November 2014, at 13:09

concave

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Top: a spoon with its convex side up.
Bottom: a spoon with its concave side up.
A concave polygon.
A concave function.

EtymologyEdit

From Old French concave, from Latin concavus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

concave (comparative more concave, superlative most concave)

  1. curved like the inner surface of a sphere or bowl
  2. (geometry, not comparable, of a polygon) not convex; having at least one internal angle greater than 180 degrees..
  3. (functional analysis, not comparable, of a real-valued function on the reals) satisfying the property that all segments connecting two points on the function's graph lie below the function.
  4. hollow; empty
    • Shakespeare
      as concave [] as a worm-eaten nut

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

concave (plural concaves)

  1. A concave surface or curve.
  2. The vault of the sky.
  3. One of the celestial spheres of the Ptolemaic or geocentric model of the world.
    Aristotle makes [Fire] to move to the concave of the Moon. - Thomas Salusbury (1661).
  4. (manufacturing) An element of a curved grid used to separate desirable material from tailings or chaff in mining and harvesting.
  5. (surfing) An indentation running along the base of a surfboard, intended to increase lift.
  6. (skateboarding) An indented area on the top of a skateboard, providing a position for foot placement and increasing board strength.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

concave (third-person singular simple present concaves, present participle concaving, simple past and past participle concaved)

  1. To render concave, or increase the degree of concavity.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

concave

  1. feminine plural of concavo

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

concave

  1. vocative masculine singular of concavus