Last modified on 21 August 2014, at 01:11

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Old French reel, from Late Latin reālis (actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing), from Proto-Indo-European *reh₁ís (wealth, goods).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

real (plural reals)

  1. A commodity; see reality.
  2. (grammar) One of the three genders that the common gender can be separated into in the Scandinavian languages.
  3. (mathematics) A real number.
    • 2007, Mark Bridges, REAL ANALYSIS: A Constructive Approach, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, page 11:
      There have been several classical constructions of the reals that avoid these prob-
      lems, the most famous ones being Dedekind Cuts and Cauchy Sequences, named
      respectively for the mathematicians Richard Dedekind (1831 - 1916) and Augustine
      Cauchy (1789 - 1857). We will not discuss these constructions here, but will use a
      more modern one developed by Gabriel Stolzenberg, based on "interval arithmetic."
  4. (obsolete) A realist.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burton to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

real (comparative realer or more real, superlative realest or most real)

  1. Actually being or existing; not fictitious or imaginary.
    a description of real life
    • Milton
      I waked, and found / Before mine eyes all real, as the dream / Had lively shadowed.
  2. That can be characterized as a confirmation of truth.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55: 
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  3. That has physical existence.
    No one has ever seen a real unicorn.
  4. (economics) Having been adjusted to remove the effects of inflation; contrasted with nominal.
    My dad calculated my family's real consumption per month.
    What is the real GNP of this polity?
  5. (economics) Relating to the result of the actions of rational agents; relating to neoclassical economic models as opposed to Keynesian models.
  6. (mathematics, of a number) Being either a rational number, or the limit of a convergent infinite sequence of rational numbers: being one of a set of numbers with a one-to-one correspondence to the points on a line.
  7. (law) Relating to immovable tangible property.
    real estatereal property
    • Francis Bacon
      Many are perfect in men's humours that are not greatly capable of the real part of business.
  8. That is an exemplary or pungent instance of a class or type.
    This is a real problem.
    Some say he is a real hero.
  9. Genuine, not faked or substituted.
    • Milton
      Whose perfection far excelled / Hers in all real dignity.
    • 2013 June 21, Oliver Burkeman, “The tao of tech”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 27: 
      The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you [] "share the things you love with the world" and so on. But the real way to build a successful online business is to be better than your rivals at undermining people's control of their own attention.
    These are real tears!
    Adopted at birth, I didn't meet my real father until I was 18.
  10. Genuine, not artificial.
    • 2013 June 1, “A better waterworks”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 5 (Technology Quarterly): 
      An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic the way real kidneys cleanse blood and eject impurities and surplus water as urine.
    This is real leather.
  11. (slang) Signifying meritorious qualities or actions especially in regards to enjoying life, prowess at sports and success wooing potential partners.
    I'm keeping it real.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdverbEdit

real (not comparable)

  1. (US, colloquial) really.
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Spanish real (royal), from Latin rēgālis (regal, royal).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

real (plural reales)

  1. Former unit of currency of Spain and Spain's colonies.
  2. A coin worth one real.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Portuguese real (royal), from Latin rēgālis (regal; royal).

NounEdit

real (plural reis or réis or reals)

  1. A unit of currency used in Portugal and its colonies from 1430 until 1911, and in Brazil from 1790 until 1942
  2. A coin worth one real.

NounEdit

real (plural reais or reals)

  1. A unit of currency used in Brazil since 1994. Symbol: R$
    • 2011, Perry Anderson, "Lula's Brazil", London Review of Books, 33.VII:
      Within weeks of this bombshell, an aide to the brother of the chairman of the PT, José Genoino, was arrested boarding a flight with 200,000 reais in a suitcase and $100,000 in his underpants.
  2. A coin worth one real.
SynonymsEdit
  • (old Portuguese and Brazilian unit of currency): rei
MeronymsEdit
  • (current Brazilian unit of currency): centavo
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin reālis (real, actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing).

AdjectiveEdit

real

  1. real (that can be characterized as a confirmation of truth; that has physical existence).

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

real

  1. That has physical existence.
  2. That is a version of a fact or statistic (especially in economics) that is intended to reflect key fundamental trends.

External linksEdit

  • real in Duden online

Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

real (feminine reale)

  1. Alternative form of roial.

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin reālis (actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing), from Proto-Indo-European *rēi- (thing; possession).

AdjectiveEdit

real m, f (plural reais; comparable)

  1. That can be characterized as a confirmation of truth; real.
  2. That has physical existence; real.
  3. (mathematics, of a number) Being a member of the set of real numbers; real.
InflectionEdit

NounEdit

real m (plural reais)

  1. a real number

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Moeda brasileira de 1 real

From Latin rēgālis (royal), from rēx (king) + -alis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king).

AdjectiveEdit

real m, f (plural reais; comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the monarchy; royal; regal.
  2. Having the air or demeanour of a monarch; royal.
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

real m (plural reais)

  1. A former Spanish currency.
  2. The current Brazilian currency.

NounEdit

real m (plural reais or réis)

  1. A former currency of Portugal and its colonies (plural later became réis).

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French réel, from Late Latin reālis (real, actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

real 4 nom/acc forms

  1. real

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin reālis (actual) from Latin rēs (matter, thing).

AdjectiveEdit

real m, f (plural reales)

  1. real
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin rēgālis (regal, royal).

AdjectiveEdit

real m, f (plural reales)

  1. royal
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

real m (plural reales)

  1. real (unit of currency)

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

real (not comparable)

  1. objective, real, pertaining to real and physical objects

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

real c

  1. short form of realskola or realskoleexamen
  2. real; currency of Brazil and formerly Portugal

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit