Last modified on 2 August 2014, at 07:15

crump

See also: Crump

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Anglo-Saxon crumb stooping, bent down, akin to Old High German chrumb, German krumm, Danish krum, and English cramp.

AdjectiveEdit

crump (comparative more crump, superlative most crump)

  1. (UK, Scotland, dialect) Hard or crusty; dry baked
    a crump loaf
  2. (obsolete) crooked; bent
    • Jeremy Taylor
      Crooked backs and crump shoulders.

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

NounEdit

crump (plural crumps)

  1. The sound of a muffled explosion.
    • 1929, Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That
      [hymn] "To an inheritance incorruptible . . . Through faith unto salvation, Ready to be revealed at the last trump." For "trump" we always used to sing "crump." A crump was German five-point-nine shell, and "the last crump" would be the end of the War.
    • 1999, Kate Atkinson, Behind the Scenes at the Museum
      Crump, crack! A shell exploded near them and the whole aircraft yawned to port as if somebody had punched it through the sky.
    • 2000, Richard Woodman, The Darkening Sea
      Above this grey skyline slowly lifting clouds of dirty smoke rose into the morning air as the salvoes of Japanese shells exploded with a delayed crump.
    • 2008, Paul Wood, BBC News. Taking cover on Sderot front line
      "Now you can see what life is like for us here," said Yakov Shoshani, raising his voice to make himself heard over the sound of a loud crump.

VerbEdit

crump (third-person singular simple present crumps, present participle crumping, simple past and past participle crumped)

  1. (intransitive) To produce such a sound.
    • 2007 September 28, William Grimes, “In Middle Leg of the Race, the Prize Was Italy”, New York Times:
      “Mortars crumped, and from the high ground to the east and south came the shriek of 88-millimeter shells, green fireballs that whizzed through the dunes at half a mile a second, trailing golden plumes of dust.”