Last modified on 3 August 2014, at 22:58
See also: Fiat, FIAT, and fiât

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fīat (let it be done).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

fiat (plural fiats)

  1. An authoritative command or order to do something; an effectual decree.
    • 1788, Alexander Hamilton, Federalist no. 73
      The reflection that the fate of a fellow-creature depended on his sole fiat, would naturally inspire scrupulousness and caution; [...]
  2. (English law) A warrant of a judge for certain processes.
  3. (English law) An authority for certain proceedings given by the Lord Chancellor's signature.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

fiat (third-person singular simple present fiats, present participle fiating, simple past and past participle fiated)

  1. (jargon used in academic debate, transitive) To make (something) happen.

QuotationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

fīat

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of fiō
  2. third-person singular present active subjunctive of faciō