EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English flet (floor of a house; house), from Old English flet, flett (the ground; the floor of a house; house; dwelling), from Proto-Germanic *flatją (a flat or level surface, level ground, floor, hallway), from Proto-Indo-European *plad- (flat, broad). Cognate with Dutch vlet (vessel), Low German Flet (an upper bedroom), German Fletz, Flötz (level ground, threshing floor, hallway, set of rooms or benches). More at flat.

NounEdit

flet (plural flets)

  1. (rare or dialectal) Floor; bottom; lower surface.
  2. (rare or dialectal) A house; home.

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

flet

  1. Imperative of flette.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet m (plural flets)

  1. flounder (fish)

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

flet

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of fleō

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English flet, flett (floor, ground; dwelling, house), from Proto-Germanic *flatją (floor), from Proto-Germanic *flataz (flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (flat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet (plural flets)

  1. the floor, ground
    Cliued mi saule to þi flet. — Northern Verse Psalter, 1400
  2. a dwelling, habitation, house, cottage, hall
    Þe lorde..Fyndez fire vpon flet, þe freke þer byside. — Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, 1400
  3. A (level) piece of ground; a battlefield
    Wiþ four othre meteþ he ... & fuld hem on þe flette. — Sir Firumbras, c1380

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Middle English Dictionary, flet

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *flatją (floor), from Proto-Germanic *flataz (flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (flat). Akin to Old Frisian flet, flette (dwelling, house)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet n (nominative plural flet)

  1. the floor, ground
    Heó on flet gecrong — She sank to the ground.
  2. a dwelling, habitation, house, cottage, hall
    Gif ðæt flet geblódgad wyrþe. — If the house be stained with blood.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • fletræst f. — couch
  • fletsittend m. — sitter in hall, courtier, guest.
  • fletwerod n. — hall-troop, body-guard
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Likely from Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float), from Proto-Indo-European *plewd-, *plew- (to float, swim, fly); compare Danish fløde (cream), Icelandic fleytið (skimming), Norwegian fløte (cream)

PronunciationEdit

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Particularly: “if the same as ety 1, then remove this Pron section and move Ety 1 Pron above ety 1 as level 3 hdr))”

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

flēt f (nominative plural flēta)

  1. cream, skimming, curds
    Hwít sealt dó on reám oððe góde fléte. — Put white salt into cream or good skimmings.
DeclensionEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", flet et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), flet.

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flet m

  1. flute (woodwind instrument)

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 23:13