Last modified on 23 October 2014, at 09:57

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English flat, from Old Norse[1] flatr (Norwegian and Swedish flat, Danish flad), from Proto-Germanic *flataz, from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (flat); akin to German Flöz (a geological layer), Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús), Latvian plats, Sanskrit प्रत्हस् (prathas, extension)[2].

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flat (comparative flatter, superlative flattest)

  1. Having no variations in height.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, The China Governess[1]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].
    The land around here is flat.
  2. (of a tire or other inflated object) Deflated, especially because of a puncture.
  3. (music, note) Lowered by one semitone.
  4. (music) Of a note or voice, lower in pitch than it should be.
  5. (music, voice) Without variations in pitch.
  6. Of a carbonated drink, with all or most of its carbon dioxide having come out of solution so that the drink no longer fizzes or contains any bubbles.
  7. Uninteresting.
    The party was a bit flat.
    • Coleridge
      A large part of the work is, to me, very flat.
    • Shakespeare
      How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable / Seem to me all the uses of this world.
  8. (wine) Lacking acidity without being sweet.
  9. Absolute.
    His claim was in flat contradiction to experimental results.
    I'm not going to the party and that's flat.
  10. (slang) Describing certain features, usually the breasts and/or buttocks, that are extremely small or not visible at all.
    That girl is completely flat on both sides.
  11. (of a battery) Unable to emit power; dead.
  12. (juggling, of a throw) Without spin; spinless.
  13. Lacking liveliness of commercial exchange and dealings; depressed; dull.
    The market is flat.
  14. (phonetics, dated, of a consonant) sonant; vocal, as distinguished from a sharp (non-sonant) consonant
  15. (obsolete) Clear; unmistakable; peremptory; absolute; positive; downright.
    • Shakespeare
      flat burglary as ever was committed
    • Marston
      A great tobacco taker too, — that's flat.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
  • (having no variations in altitude): bumpy, cratered, hilly (of terrain), rough (of a surface), wrinkled (of a surface)
  • (music: lowered by one semitone): sharp
  • (music: lower in pitch than it should be): sharp
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdverbEdit

flat (comparative more flat, superlative most flat)

  1. So as to be flat.
    Spread the tablecloth flat over the table.
  2. Bluntly.
    I asked him if he wanted to marry me and he turned me down flat.
  3. (with units of time, distance, etc) Not exceeding.
    He can run a mile in four minutes flat.
  4. Completely.
    I am flat broke this month.
  5. Directly; flatly.
    • Herbert
      Sin is flat opposite to the Almighty.
  6. (finance, slang) Without allowance for accrued interest.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

A flat tire

flat (plural flats)

  1. An area of level ground.
    • Francis Bacon
      Envy is as the sunbeams that beat hotter upon a bank, or steep rising ground, than upon a flat.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 3, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.
  2. (music) A note played a semitone lower than a natural, denoted by the symbol sign placed after the letter representing the note (e.g., B♭) or in front of the note symbol (e.g. ♭♪).
  3. (informal, automotive) A flat tyre/tire.
  4. (in the plural) A type of ladies' shoes with very low heels.
    She liked to walk in her flats more than in her high heels.
  5. (painting) A thin, broad brush used in oil and watercolor/watercolour painting.
  6. The flat part of something:
    1. (swordfighting) The flat side of a blade, as opposed to the sharp edge.
    2. The palm of the hand, with the adjacent part of the fingers.
  7. A wide, shallow container.
    a flat of strawberries
  8. (geometry) A subset of n-dimensional space that is congruent to a Euclidean space of lower dimension.
  9. A flat-bottomed boat, without keel, and of small draught.
  10. A straw hat, broad-brimmed and low-crowned.
  11. A railroad car without a roof, and whose body is a platform without sides; a platform car.
  12. A platform on a wheel, upon which emblematic designs etc. are carried in processions.
  13. (mining) A horizontal vein or ore deposit auxiliary to a main vein; also, any horizontal portion of a vein not elsewhere horizontal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
  14. (obsolete) A dull fellow; a simpleton.
    • Holmes
      Or if you cannnot make a speech, / Because you are a flat.
  15. (technical theatre) A rectangular wooden structure covered with masonite, lauan or muslin that can be raised as a platform.
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

flat (third-person singular simple present flats, present participle flatting, simple past and past participle flatted)

  1. (poker slang) To make a flat call; to call without raising.
  2. (intransitive) To become flat or flattened; to sink or fall to an even surface.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir W. Temple to this entry?)
  3. (intransitive, music, colloquial) To fall from the pitch.
  4. (transitive, music) To depress in tone, as a musical note; especially, to lower in pitch by half a tone.
  5. (transitive, dated) To make flat; to flatten; to level.
  6. (transitive, dated) To render dull, insipid, or spiritless; to depress.
    • Barrow
      Passions are allayed, appetites are flatted.

Etymology 2Edit

From 1795, alteration of Scots flet (inner part of a house), from Middle English flet (dwelling), from Old English flet, flett (ground floor, dwelling), from Proto-Germanic *flatją (floor), from Proto-Germanic *flataz (flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (flat). Akin to Old Frisian flet, flette (dwelling, house). More at flet, flat1.

NounEdit

A block of flats (apartments) in Wrocław

flat (plural flats)

  1. (chiefly UK) An apartment.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Flat in Online Etymology Dictionary
  2. ^ Sanskrit, OHG and Greek cognates named

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flat m (plural flats, diminutive flatje n)

  1. flat, apartment

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

flat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of flō

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

flāt

  1. first-person singular preterite form of flītan
  2. third-person singular preterite form of flītan

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

flat m (genitive flat, plural flataichean)

  1. saucer
  2. flat, apartment

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse flatr, from Proto-Germanic *flataz, from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (flat).

AdjectiveEdit

flat

  1. flat (having no variations in altitude)
    Solen reflekterades i spegelns flata yta.
    The sun was reflected in the flat surface of the mirror.
  2. spineless, being a doormat, abstaining from defending one's convictions
    Han var alldeles för flat mot chefen, och fick inte heller någon löneökning.
    He let the manager walk all over him and did not get a raise.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit