Last modified on 23 October 2014, at 10:04

flip-flop

EnglishEdit

A variety of colorful flip-flops.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoetic: most probably an imitation of the sound produced when walking in them.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flip-flop (plural flip-flops)

  1. (US) An instance of flip-flopping, of repeatedly changing one's stated opinion about a matter. [from 19th c.]
  2. (computing, electronics) An electronic switching circuit that has either two stable states (switching between them in response to a trigger) or a stable and an unstable state (switching from one to the other and back again in response to a trigger), and which is thereby capable of serving as one bit of memory. [from 20th c.]
    • 2012, George Dyson, Turing's Cathedral, Penguin 2013, p. 72:
      Ten two-state flip-flops […] were formed into ten-stage ring counters representing each decimal digit in the ten-digit accumulators […].
  3. A sandal, usually of rubber, secured to the foot by two straps mounted between the big toe and its neighbour. [from 20th c.]

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

flip-flop (third-person singular simple present flip-flops, present participle flip-flopping, simple past and past participle flip-flopped)

  1. To alternate back and forth between directly opposite opinions, ideas, or decisions.

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

flip-flop m (plural flip-flops)

  1. flip-flop (type of electronic circuit)