Last modified on 14 June 2014, at 11:58

circuit

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English circuit, from Old French circuit, from Latin circuitus (a going round), from circuire (go round), from circum (around) + ire

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

circuit (plural circuits)

  1. The act of moving or revolving around, or as in a circle or orbit; a revolution; as, the periodical circuit of the earth around the sun.
  2. The circumference of, or distance around, any space; the measure of a line around an area.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Stow,:
      So the circuit or compass of Ireland is 1,800 miles, which is 200 less than Caesar doth reckon or account.
  3. That which encircles anything, as a ring or crown.
    • 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part II, Act III, Scene I, line 351:
      And this fell tempest shall not cease to rage Until the golden circuit on my head, Like to the glorious sun's transparent beams, Do calm the fury of this mad-bred flaw.
  4. The space enclosed within a circle, or within limits.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, Stanza 39, line 229:
      "Fondling," she saith, "since I have hemm'd thee here Within the circuit of this ivory pale, I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer: Feed where thou wilt, on mountain, or in dale; Graze on my lips; and if those hills be dry, Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      A circuit wide enclosed with goodliest trees.
  5. (electricity) Enclosed path of an electric current, usually designed for a certain function.
  6. A regular or appointed journeying from place to place in the exercise of one's calling, as of a judge, or a preacher.
  7. (law) A certain division of a state or country, established by law for a judge or judges to visit, for the administration of justice.
  8. (law) Abbreviation of circuit court.
  9. (Methodist Church) A district in which an itinerant preacher labors.
  10. By analogy to the proceeding three, a set of theaters among which the same acts circulate; especially common in the heyday of vaudeville.
  11. (obsolete) circumlocution
    • Huloet
      Thou hast used no circuit of words.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

circuit (third-person singular simple present circuits, present participle circuiting, simple past and past participle circuited)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To move in a circle; to go round; to circulate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Philips to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) To travel around.
    Having circuited the air.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

circuit n (plural circuits, diminutive circuitje n)

  1. (sports) racetrack
  2. (physics) electric circuit
  3. (figuratively) exclusive group of individuals, clique, circle

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin

NounEdit

circuit m (plural circuits)

  1. circuit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

circuit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of circueō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin circuitus

NounEdit

circuit n

  1. circuit

Related termsEdit