Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 11:44

swap

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English swappen (to swap), probably from Old English *swappian, a secondary form of Old English swāpan (to swoop). Cognate with German schwappen (to swap).

NounEdit

swap (plural swaps)

Alice has a red apple and Bob has a green apple. After a swap, Alice has the green apple and Bob has the red apple.
  1. An exchange of two comparable things.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  2. (finance) A financial derivative in which two parties agree to exchange one stream of cashflow against another stream.
  3. (obsolete, UK, dialect) A blow; a stroke.
  4. (computing, informal, uncountable) Space available in a swap file for use as auxiliary memory.
    How much swap do you need?

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VerbEdit

swap (third-person singular simple present swaps, present participle swapping, simple past and past participle swapped)

  1. To exchange or give (something) in an exchange (for something else).
    • 1998, Michael Wolf; Bruce Friedman, Daniel Sutherland, Religion in the workplace, page 98:
      In an effort to provide more permanent accommodations, employers may offer employees the opportunity either to swap jobs with a colleague or to transfer to a new position.
    • 2007, Lloyd Zimpel, A Season of Fire and Ice:
      Chief watched these goings-on without pleasure, and waved them off in disgust when the smarmiest of the two suggested he might wish to swap that elk's tooth for this jug of fine rye whiskey.
    • 2011, Andrew Scott Cooper, The Oil Kings: How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia Changed the Balance of Power in the Middle East, page 253:
      The Shah wanted to swap oil for more arms.
  2. (obsolete) To strike, hit.
    • 1485, Syr Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Bk.VI, Ch.xvij:
      And soo sir launcelot rode on the one syde and she on the other / he had not ryden but a whyle / but the knyghte badde sir Launcelot torne hym and loke behynde hym / [] / And soo sir launcelot torned hym [] / and there wyth was the knyghte and the lady on one syde / & sodenly he swapped of his ladyes hede
  3. (obsolete) To fall or descend; to rush hastily or violently.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of C. Richardson (Dict.) to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) To beat the air, or ply the wings, with a sweeping motion or noise; to flap.

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FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English swap.

NounEdit

swap

  1. (finance, slang) swap (financial derivative)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

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