imperative

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin imperātīvus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

imperative (comparative more imperative, superlative most imperative)

  1. essential
    It is imperative that you come here right now.
  2. (computing theory) Having a semantics that incorporates mutable variables.
  3. (grammar) of, or relating to the imperative mood
  4. Expressing a command; authoritatively or absolutely directive.
    imperative orders
    • Bishop Hall
      The suits of kings are imperative.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

imperative (countable and uncountable, plural imperatives)

  1. (uncountable, grammar) The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.
    The verbs in sentences like "Do it!" and "Say what you like!" are in the imperative.
  2. (countable, grammar) A verb in imperative mood.
  3. (countable) An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.
    Visiting Berlin is an imperative.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

imperative f pl

  1. feminine plural of imperativo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From imperātīvus (commanded), from imperō (command, order), from im- (form of in) + parō (prepare, arrange; intend).

AdverbEdit

imperātīvē (not comparable)

  1. In an imperative manner, imperatively.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • imperative in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
Last modified on 1 April 2014, at 20:11