Last modified on 16 June 2014, at 07:52

inevitable

See also: inévitable

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French inevitable, from Latin inevitabilis (unavoidable), from in + evitabilis (avoidable), from evitare (to avoid), from e (out) + vitare (to shun).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈɛvɪtəbəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable (not comparable)

  1. Impossible to avoid or prevent.
    We were going so fast that the collision was inevitable.
  2. Predictable, or always happening.
    My outburst met with the inevitable punishment.
    • 2012 May 9, Jonathan Wilson, “Europa League: Radamel Falcao's Atlético Madrid rout Athletic Bilbao”, the Guardian:
      Every break seemed dangerous and Falcao clearly had the beating of Amorebieta. Others, being forced to stretch a foot behind them to control Arda Turan's 34th-minute cross, might simply have lashed a shot on the turn; Falcao, though, twisted back on to his left foot, leaving Amorebieta in a heap, and thumped in an inevitable finish – his 12th goal in 15 European matches this season.

Usage notesEdit

Largely synonymous with unavoidable, slightly more formal (borrowed as a unit from Latin, rather than formed in English), and with nuances of a natural consequence that occurs after – “inevitable punishment”, “inevitable result”. By contrast, unavoidable has some nuance of existing circumstances – “I was unavoidably detained.” – without there necessarily being a cause. Further, unavoidable has nuances of “could not have happened any other way, even if circumstances were different”, while inevitable connotes “given circumstances, this is the necessary result.”.

Compare “the disaster was inevitable”, meaning “sooner or later the disaster would happen (because they did not prepare)” with “the disaster was unavoidable”, meaning “even if they had prepared, the disaster would have happened”.

Often used with a negative connotation, but may be used with a positive or neutral sense of fate, as in “Given our preparations, our victory was inevitable.” in which case *unavoidable is not acceptable.

In the same manner, impreventable and inevitable have different nuances. The sense “the disease was inevitable” means “It was natural to suffer the disease”; the sense “the disease was impreventable” means “There was no preventive methods against the disease”.

Thus, "inevitable" indicates "unable to avoid due to natural or necessary matters", "unavoidable" indicates "unable to avoid due to incidental matters", impreventable indicates "unable to avoid due to the absence of preventive methods".

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

inevitable (plural inevitables)

  1. Something that is predictable, necessary, or cannot be avoided.
    • 2009 August 22, Murray Whyte, “Seeking successors to the Queen West gallery scene”, Toronto Star:
      In the migratory patterns of the city's art scenes, there are two inevitables: First, that neighbourhoods where art makes its home become instantly more attractive; and second, because of it, art won't be at home for long.

AntonymsEdit

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External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inēvītābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable (epicene, plural inevitables)

  1. inevitable

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ evitable

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable m, f (masculine and feminine plural inevitables)

  1. inevitable

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inēvītābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable m, f (plural inevitables)

  1. inevitable

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable m, f (plural inevitables)

  1. inevitable; unavoidable

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inēvītābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inevitable m, f (plural inevitables)

  1. inevitable, inescapable, unavoidable (unable to be avoided)

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit