Last modified on 18 August 2014, at 14:51

infuse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin [in]fu(n)do fu(n)dere fusi fusum: to pour.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

infuse (third-person singular simple present infuses, present participle infusing, simple past and past participle infused)

  1. (transitive) To cause to become an element of something; to insert or fill.
  2. (transitive) To steep in a liquid, so as to extract the soluble constituents (usually medicinal or herbal).
    • Coxe
      One scruple of dried leaves is infused in ten ounces of warm water.
  3. (transitive) To inspire; to inspirit or animate; to fill (with).
    • Shakespeare
      Infuse his breast with magnanimity.
    • Shakespeare
      infusing him with self and vain conceit
  4. (transitive) To instill as a quality.
    • Shakespeare
      That souls of animals infuse themselves / Into the trunks of men.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Why should he desire to have qualities infused into his son, which himself never possessed, or knew, or found the want of, in the acquisition of his wealth?
  5. (intransitive) To undergo infusion.
    • Let it infuse for five minutes.
  6. (transitive) To make an infusion with (an ingredient); to tincture; to saturate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To pour in, as a liquid; to pour (into or upon); to shed.
    • Denham
      That strong Circean liquor cease to infuse.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1902 Webster's International dictionary.
  • 1984 Consise Oxford 7th ed.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

infuse f

  1. feminine form of infus

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

infuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of infondere

infuse f

  1. plural form of infuso

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

infūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of infūsus