Last modified on 8 September 2014, at 12:08

language

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English language, from Old French language, from Vulgar Latin *linguāticum, from Latin lingua (tongue, speech, language), from Old Latin dingua (tongue), from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s (tongue, speech, language). Displaced native Middle English rearde, ȝerearde (language) (from Old English reord (language, speech)), Middle English londspreche, londspeche (language) (from Old English *landsprǣċ (language, national tongue), Old English þēod and þēodisc (language).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

language (countable and uncountable, plural languages)

  1. (countable) A form of communication using words either spoken or gestured with the hands and structured with grammar, often with a writing system.
    the English language;   sign language
  2. (uncountable) The ability to communicate using words.
    the gift of language
  3. (countable or uncountable) Nonverbal communication.
    body language
  4. (computing, countable) A computer language.
  5. (uncountable) The vocabulary and usage used in a particular specialist field.
    legal language
    • 1893, Walter Besant, “Prologue”, in The Ivory Gate:
      Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language, he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.
  6. (uncountable) The particular words used in speech or a passage of text.
    The language he used to talk to me was obscene.
    The language used in the law does not permit any other interpretation.
  7. (uncountable) Profanity.
    • 1978, James Carroll, Mortal Friends, ISBN 0440157897, page 500:
      "Where the hell is Horace?" ¶"There he is. He's coming. You shouldn't use language."
  8. Spoken or written words.

SynonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

VerbEdit

language (third-person singular simple present languages, present participle languaging, simple past and past participle languaged)

  1. To communicate by language; to express in language.
    Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense. — Fuller.

StatisticsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

language m (plural languages)

  1. Archaic spelling of langage.



Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

language m (plural languages)

  1. language (style of communicating)

See alsoEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Vulgar Latin *linguāticum, from Classical Latin lingua (tongue, language).

NounEdit

language f (oblique plural languages, nominative singular language, nominative plural languages)

  1. language (style of communicating)

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit