Last modified on 29 October 2014, at 00:03

mickle

See also: muckle

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mikel, muchel, mochel, mukel, from Old English miċel, myċel or Old Norse mikill, both from Proto-Germanic *mikilaz.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mickle (comparative more mickle, superlative most mickle)

  1. (now chiefly Scotland and Northumbrian) Large, great.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song:
      at gloaming a shepherd would see it, with its great wings half-folded across the great belly of it and its head, like the head of a meikle cock, but with the ears of a lion, poked over a for tree, watching.
  2. (now chiefly Scotland and Northumbrian) Much; a great quantity or amount of.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.7:
      Full many wounds in his corrupted flesh / He did engrave, and muchell blood did spend […].
  3. (now chiefly Scotland and Northumbrian) Most; the majority of.

Usage notesEdit

Use in Northumbrian is occasional, the term muckle is more common.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

mickle (uncountable)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) A great amount.
    Many a little makes a mickle.
  2. (obsolete) Important or great people as a​ class.
  3. (obsolete) Greatness, largeness, stature.
  4. (Scotland) A small amount.

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

mickle

  1. (now chiefly Scotland) A large amount or great extent.
    • 1721. James Kelly, A Complete Collection of Scottish Proverbs:
      Seek mickle, and get something; seek little, and get nothing.

AdverbEdit

mickle (comparative more mickle, superlative most mickle)

  1. (now chiefly Scotland) To a great extent.
  2. (obsolete) Often, frequently.

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English miċel, myċel.

AdjectiveEdit

mickle (comparative mair mickle, superlative maist mickle)

  1. much, great

NounEdit

mickle (uncountable)

  1. a great amount