Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 11:28
See also: motė, möte, and mõte

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mot, from Old English mot (grain of sand).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mote (plural motes)

  1. A small particle; a speck.
  2. A tiny computer for remote sensing. Also known as smartdust.
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English moten, from Old English mōtan (to be allowed, be able to, have the opportunity to, be compelled to, may, must), from Proto-Germanic *mōtaną (to be able to, have to, be delegated), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (to acquire, possess, be in charge of). Cognate with Dutch moeten (to have to, must), German müssen (to have to, must), Danish måtte (might, may), Ancient Greek μέδω (médō, to prevail, dominate, rule over). Related to empty.

VerbEdit

mote

  1. (now archaic) May or might. [from 9th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      he […] kept aloofe for dread to be descryde, / Untill fit time and place he mote espy, / Where he mote worke him scath and villeny.
  2. (obsolete) Must. [9th-17th c.]
  3. (now archaic) Forming subjunctive expressions of wish: may. [from 9th c.]
    • 1980, Erica Jong, Fanny:
      ‘I shall not take Vengeance into my own Hands. The Goddess will do what She will.’ ‘So mote it be,’ said the Grandmaster.
Usage notesEdit
  • Generally takes an infinitive without to.

Etymology 3Edit

See moot (a meeting).

NounEdit

mote (plural motes)

  1. (obsolete) A meeting for discussion.
    a wardmote in the city of London
  2. (obsolete) A body of persons who meet for discussion, especially about the management of affairs.
    a folkmote
  3. (obsolete) A place of meeting for discussion.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mote

  1. plural form of mota

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mote

  1. rōmaji reading of もて

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

mōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōtus

NorwegianEdit

NounEdit

mote m

  1. fashion

InflectionEdit


SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French or Provençal mot (saying).

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. nickname
  2. motto (heraldry)

Etymology 2Edit

From Quechua mut'i

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. (South America) hulled cereal, especially pearl barley and hominy
Derived termsEdit

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

mote

  1. dative singular of mot