Last modified on 3 March 2015, at 07:58

moat

See also: möät

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mote, from Old French mote ("mound, embankment"; compare also Old French motte (hillock, lump, clod, turf), from Medieval Latin mota (a mound, hill, a hill on which a castle is built, castle, embankment, turf)), of Germanic origin, perhaps via Old Frankish *mot, *motta (mud, peat, bog, turf), from Proto-Germanic *mutô, *mudraz, *muþraz (dirt, filth, mud, swamp), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)mut- (dark, dirty). Cognate with Alemannic German Mott, Mutte (peat, turf), Bavarian Mott (peat, turf), Dutch dialectal mot (dust, fine sand), Lua error in Module:etymology_language at line 136: The source language/family code "frs" is not valid. Lua error in Module:links/templates at line 52: The language code "frs" is not valid., Swedish muta (to drizzle), Old English mot (speck, particle). More at mote, mud, smut.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moat (plural moats)

  1. A deep, wide defensive ditch, normally filled with water, surrounding a fortified habitation.
  2. An aspect of a business which makes it more "defensible" from competitors, either because of the nature of its products, services, franchise or other reason.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmo̞ɑt̪], IPA(key): [ˈmo̞ːɑt̪]
  • Hyphenation: mo‧at

NounEdit

moat

  1. plural form of moa

AnagramsEdit