Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 01:50

outstrip

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

outstrip (third-person singular simple present outstrips, present participle outstripping, simple past and past participle outstripped)

  1. To outrun or leave behind.
    We quickly outstripped the amateur runners.
    • 2011 February 4, Gareth Roberts, “Wales 19-26 England”, BBC:
      The wing outstripped Mark Cueto, but Foden's excellent cover tackle killed the threat.
  2. To exceed, excel or surpass.
    This year's production has already outstripped last year's.
    • 2011 December 19, Kerry Brown, “Kim Jong-il obituary”, The Guardian:
      Kim was educated at the newly founded university in Pyongyang, named after his father, graduating in 1964. The 1960s and early 1970s were the golden years for the DPRK. It undertook rapid industrialisation, economically outstripped its southern competitor, and enjoyed the support of both the People's Republic of China, and the Soviet Union.

TranslationsEdit