transcend

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French transcender, Latin transcendere (to climb over, step over, surpass, transcend), from trans (over) + scandere (to climb); see scan; compare ascend, descend.

VerbEdit

transcend (third-person singular simple present transcends, present participle transcending, simple past and past participle transcended)

  1. (transitive) to pass beyond the limits of something.
    • Francis Bacon
      such popes as shall transcend their limits
  2. (transitive) to surpass, as in intensity or power; to excel.
    • Dryden
      How much her worth transcended all her kind.
  3. (obsolete) To climb; to mount.
    lights in the heavens transcending the region of the clouds
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Howell to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External linksEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 04:11