Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 02:25

resistance

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Late Latin resistantia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

resistance (countable and uncountable, plural resistances)

  1. The act of resisting, or the capacity to resist.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. […]. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.
    widespread resistance to the new urban development plans
    the resistance of bacteria to certain antibiotics
  2. (physics) A force that tends to oppose motion.
  3. (physics) Shortened form of electrical resistance.
  4. An underground organization engaged in a struggle for liberation from forceful occupation.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit