Last modified on 28 October 2014, at 06:33

ripple

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Middle English rypelen, frequentative of rippen 'to rip'. More at rip.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ripple (plural ripples)

  1. A moving disturbance or undulation in the surface of a liquid.
    I dropped a small stone into the pond and watched the ripples.
  2. A sound similar to that of undulating water.
  3. A style of ice cream in which flavors have been coarsely blended together.
    I enjoy fudge ripple ice cream, but I especially like to dig through the carton to get at the ripple part and eat only that.
  4. (electronics) A small oscillation of an otherwise steady signal.
  5. An implement, with teeth like those of a comb, for removing the seeds and seed vessels from flax, broom corn, etc.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ripple (third-person singular simple present ripples, present participle rippling, simple past and past participle rippled)

  1. To move like the undulating surface of a body of water; to undulate.
  2. To propagate like a moving wave.
    • 2008, Bradley Simpson, Economists with Guns, page 65:
      These problems were complicated by a foreign exchange crunch which rippled through the economy in 1961-1962, [...].
  3. To make a sound as of water running gently over a rough bottom, or the breaking of ripples on the shore.
  4. To remove the seeds from (the stalks of flax, etc.), by means of a ripple.
  5. (by extension) To scratch or tear.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit