Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:10

brake

EnglishEdit

Disk brake on a motorcycle.
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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Apparently a shortened form of bracken. (Compare chick, chicken.)

NounEdit

brake (plural brakes)

  1. A fern; bracken. [from 14th c.]

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Middle Low German brake.

NounEdit

brake (plural brakes)

  1. A thicket, or an area overgrown with briers etc. [from 15th c.]
    • 1807, William Wordsworth, Poems, Fidelity:
      He halts, and searches with his eyes
      Among the scatter'd rocks:
      And now at distance can discern
      A stirring in a brake of fern []
    • Shakespeare
      Rounds rising hillocks, brakes obscure and rough, / To shelter thee from tempest and from rain.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      He stayed not for brake, and he stopped not for stone.

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Dutch braeke.

NounEdit

brake (plural brakes)

  1. A tool used for breaking flax or hemp. [from 15th c.]
  2. A type of machine for bending sheet metal. (See wikipedia.)
  3. A large, heavy harrow for breaking clods after ploughing; a drag.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

brake (third-person singular simple present brakes, present participle braking, simple past and past participle braked)

  1. (transitive) To bruise and crush; to knead
    The farmer's son brakes the flax while mother brakes the bread dough
  2. (transitive) To pulverise with a harrow
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Origin uncertain.

NounEdit

brake (plural brakes)

  1. (military) An ancient engine of war analogous to the crossbow and ballista.
    1. (obsolete) The winch of a crossbow. [14th-19th c.]
  2. (chiefly nautical) The handle of a pump.
  3. A device used to slow or stop the motion of a wheel, or of a vehicle, by friction; also, the controls or apparatus used to engage such a mechanism such as the pedal in a car. [from 18th c.]
    1. The act of braking, of using a brake to slow down a machine or vehicle
    2. (engineering) An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine or other motor by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake.
    3. (figuratively) Something used to retard or stop some action, process etc.
  4. A baker's kneading trough.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  5. A device used to confine or prevent the motion of an animal.
    1. A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him.
    2. An enclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc.
      • 1868, March 7, The Illustrated London News, number 1472, volume 52, “Law and Police”, page 223:
        He was shooting, and the field where the [cock-fighting] ring was verged on the shooting-brake where the rabbits were.
      • J. Brende
        A horse [] which Philip had bought [] and because of his fierceness kept him within a brake of iron bars.
    3. A cart or carriage without a body, used in breaking in horses.W
    4. A carriage for transporting shooting parties and their equipment.W
  6. That part of a carriage, as of a movable battery, or engine, which enables it to turn.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

brake (third-person singular simple present brakes, present participle braking, simple past and past participle braked)

  1. (intransitive) To operate (a) brake(s).
  2. (intransitive) To be stopped or slowed (as if) by braking.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 5Edit

Origin uncertain.

NounEdit

brake (plural brakes)

  1. (obsolete) A cage. [16th-17th c.]
  2. (now historical) A type of torture instrument. [from 16th c.]
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 83:
      Methods of applying pain were many and ingenious, in particular the ways of twisting, stretching and manipulating the body out of shape, normally falling under the catch-all term of the rack, or the brakes.

Etymology 6Edit

Inflected forms.

VerbEdit

brake

  1. (archaic) simple past tense and past participle of break
    • Exodus 32:3, KJV:
      And all the people brake off the golden earrings []

AnagramsEdit



DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

brake

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of breken
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of braken

AnagramsEdit