Last modified on 22 August 2014, at 21:45

sanger

See also: Sanger

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Diminutive of sandwich; corruption of the earlier diminutive sango. Australian from 1960s.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sanger (plural sangers)

  1. (Australia, informal, colloquial) A sandwich. [From 1960s.]
    • 1996, Shane Maloney, The Brush-Off, 2006, page 140,
      [] I popped the last of the strawberry sangers into my mouth, craned my neck over the bureaucrat′s gelati-hued shoulder and feasted my eyes.
    • 2005, R. T. Stone, The Journals: Into the Gulf, Book 2, page 459,
      [] Allison did most of the talking telling Sara of her victory, of meeting Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova—who won the Family Circle Open—of rubbing the elbows with the Australian elite, and making sangers (sandwiches) for broken families in Brisbane.
    • 2009, Justine Vaisutis, Australia, Lonely Planet, page 94,
      Eat Rock oysters, rock lobsters, yabbies and prawns; also Turkish bread ‘sangers’ and Tim Tam shooters
    • 2009, Central Australia: Adelaide to Darwin, page 59,
      Winning pub-grub at this enduring pub boozer: steak sangers, veggie lasagne, lamb-shank pie, king-prawn salad and blueberry pancakes.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sanger (plural sangers)

  1. Alternative form of sangar.
    • 1895, United States Cavalry Association, Journal of the United States Cavalry Association, Volume 8, page 223,
      The enemy had a line of sangers along the far edge of nullah right across the valley, with sangers at intervals up the steep mountains on either side into the snows, and occupied, as far as we could guess, by some 2,000 men.
    • 1902, Great Britain House of Commons, Sessional Papers, Volume 69, page 64,
      At 4.30 a.m., under cover of a mist in the donga, the Boers made a very severe attack on the north and west of my position, the brunt of the attack fell on two sangers held by the Durham Company of Artillery; the Boers broke through the wire and got to within 20 yards of those sangers, but they both gallantly held their own and I, with the aid of the Maxim, was able to repulse the attack.
    • 1976, Byron Farwell, The Great Boer War, page 93,
      [] the Boer marksmen leaned over their sangers and fired on the helmeted heads below them.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sǫngari.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sanɡər/, [ˈsɑŋɐ]

NounEdit

sanger c (singular definite sangeren, plural indefinite sangere)

  1. singer
  2. poet, bard
  3. minstrel
  4. songbird, songster
  5. warbler (Sylviidae)

InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

sanger m

  1. indefinite plural of sang
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

NounEdit

sanger m (definite singular sangeren, indefinite plural sangere, definite plural sangerne)

  1. a singer
  2. a songbird

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit