sojourn

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French sojor, sojorner (modern séjour, séjourner), from (assumed) Vulgar Latin *subdiurnāre, from Latin sub- (under, a little over) + Late Latin diurnus (lasting for a day), from Latin dies (day).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sojourn (plural sojourns)

  1. A short stay somewhere.
    • 2006, Joseph Price Remington, Paul Beringer, Remington: The Science And Practice Of Pharmacy (page 1168)
      The use of vasoconstrictors to increase the sojourn of local anesthetics at the site of infiltration continues []
  2. A temporary residence.
    Though long detained / In that obscure sojourn. — Milton.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sojourn (third-person singular simple present sojourns, present participle sojourning, simple past and past participle sojourned)

  1. (intransitive) To reside somewhere temporarily, especially as a guest or lodger.
    • Bible, Genesis xii. 30
      Abram went down into Egypt to sojourn there.
    • Hayward
      The soldiers first assembled at Newcastle, and there sojourned three days.

ConjugationEdit

  • The archaic third-person singular present active indicative form sojourneth is also attested.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sojourn” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 02:19