Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:43
See also: sub-

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortened form of any of various words beginning sub-, such as submarine, subroutine, substitute, subscription.

The sandwich is so called because the bun's cylindrical shape resembles the shape of a submarine.

NounEdit

sub (plural subs)

  1. A submarine.
  2. A submarine sandwich—a sandwich made on a long bun.
    We can get subs at that deli.
  3. (US, informal) A substitute.
    With the score 4 to 1, they brought in subs.
    She worked as a sub until she got her teaching certificate.
  4. (UK, informal) A substitute in a football (soccer) game: someone who comes on in place of another player part way through the game.
    • 1930, Boy's Live, Philip Scruggs, There Can Be Victory, page 20
      At any other school you would be playing varsity, and Wallace has you pigeon-holed on the subs." "Maybe he has his reasons," Jim replied. "And he hasn't pigeon-holed me on the subs yet — not this season.
  5. (UK, informal, often in plural) Short for subscription: a payment made for membership of a club, etc.
  6. (informal) A submissive in BDSM practices.
    • 2004, Paul Baker, Fantabulosa: A Dictionary of Polari and Gay Slang‎
      ...roleplay where a sub or bottom takes care of a top's bodily and hygiene needs...
    • 2007, Laurell K Hamilton, The Harlequin
      "It means that I'm both a sub and a dom." "Submissive and dominant," I said. He nodded.
    • 2008, Lannie Rose, How to Change Your Sex
      Typically a dom and a sub have a more or less standard routine that they like to go through all the time.
  7. (Internet, informal) A subtitle.
    I've just noticed a mistake in the subs for this film.
  8. (computing, programming) A subroutine (sometimes one that does not return a value, as distinguished from a function, which does).
    • 2002, Nathan Patwardhan, Ellen Siever, Stephen Spainhour, Perl in a nutshell
      The default accessor can be overridden by declaring a sub of the same name in the package.
    • 2004, P. K. McBride, Introductory Visual Basic.NET (page 49)
      So far, all the subs and functions that we have used have been those built into the system, or those written to handle events from controls...
  9. (colloquial, dated) A subordinate.
  10. (colloquial, dated) A subaltern.
SynonymsEdit
HypernymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sub (third-person singular simple present subs, present participle subbing, simple past and past participle subbed)

  1. (US, informal) To substitute for.
  2. (US, informal) To work as a substitute teacher, especially in primary and secondary education.
  3. (UK, informal, soccer) To replace (a player) with a substitute.
    He never really made a contribution to the match, so it was no surprise when he was subbed at half time.
  4. (UK, informal, soccer) Less commonly, and often as sub on, to bring on (a player) as a substitute.
    He was subbed on half way through the second half, and scored within minutes.
  5. (UK) To perform the work of a subeditor or copy editor; to subedit.
  6. (UK, slang, transitive) To lend.
    • 2011, Rowland Rivron, What the F*** Did I Do Last Night?
      I kept up the pleasantries as we were drying our hands and, realizing I didn't have any change for the lodger, I asked him, one drummer to another like, if he could sub me a quid for the dish.
  7. (slang, intransitive) To subscribe.
  8. (BDSM) To take a submissive role.
    • Alicia White, Jessica's Breakdown (page 53)
      You've never subbed before. Jessica will be expecting a man on stage that follows orders and enjoys what she's going to be doing. Do you want to be spanked? Possibly whipped?
    • 2012, Tiffany Reisz, Little Red Riding Crop
      Wasn't like she'd never subbed before. She'd been a sub longer than she'd been a Dominatrix–ten years she'd spent in a collar.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin sub.

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. Under.

VerbEdit

sub (third-person singular simple present subs, present participle subbing, simple past and past participle subbed)

  1. To coat with a layer of adhering material; to planarize by means of such a coating.
  2. (microscopy) To prepare (a slide) with an layer of transparent substance to support and/or fix the sample.
    • 1997, Marina A. Lynch, S. M. O'Mara (editors), Ali D. Hames, D. Rickwood (series editors), Neuroscience Labfax, page 166,
      Ensure that gloves are worn when handling subbed slides. Although the following protocol describes subbing with gelatin, slides may also be coated with either 3-(triethoxysilyl-)propylamine (TESPA) or poly-L-lysine for in situ hybridization.

See alsoEdit

  • switch (one who is willing to take either a sadistic or a masochistic role)

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sub.

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. under, below

AntonymsEdit


IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. under, below

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

sub m, f (invariable)

  1. skin-diver, scuba diver

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *upo.

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. (with ablative) under, beneath
  2. (with ablative) behind
  3. (with ablative) at the feet of
  4. (with ablative) within, during
  5. (with ablative) about, around (time)

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. (with accusative) under, up to, up under, close to (of a motion)
  2. (with accusative) until, before, up to, about

DescendantsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

sub

  1. rafsi of sfubu.

NovialEdit

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. under

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin subtus, from sub.

PrepositionEdit

sub

  1. under, below, beneath, underneath

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

sub c

  1. (slang) a subwoofer, a bass loudspeaker; Contraction of subwoofer.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit