EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lende (usually in plural as lendes, leendes, lyndes), from Old English lendenu, lendinu (loins, plural), from Proto-Germanic *landijō, *landį̄ (loin), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (loin, kidney). Cognate with Scots lend, leynd (the loins, flank, buttocks), Dutch lendenen (loins, reins), German Lenden (loins), Swedish länder (loins), Icelandic lendar (loins), Latin lumbus (loin), Russian лядвея (ljádveja, thigh, haunch).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lend (plural lends or linder)

  1. (anatomy, UK dialectal) The lumbar region; loin.
  2. (UK dialectal, of a person or animal) The loins; flank; buttocks.

Etymology 2Edit

From earlier len (with excrescent -d, as in sound, round, etc.), from Middle English lenen, lænen, from Old English lǣnan (to lend; give, grant, lease), from Proto-Germanic *laihnijaną (to loan), from Proto-Germanic *laihną (loan), from Proto-Indo-European *leykʷ- (to leave, leave over). Cognate with Scots len, lend (to lend), West Frisian liene (to lend, borrow, loan), Dutch lenen (to lend, borrow, loan), German lehnen (to borrow, lend out, loan), Swedish låna (to lend, loan), Icelandic lána (to lend, loan), Icelandic léna (to grant), Latin linquō (quit, leave, forlet), Ancient Greek λείπω (léipō, leave, release). See also loan.

VerbEdit

lend (third-person singular simple present lends, present participle lending, simple past and past participle lent)

  1. (transitive) To allow to be used by someone temporarily, on condition that it or its equivalent will be returned.
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 71: 
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
    I will only lend you my car if you fill up the tank.
    I lent her 10 euros to pay for the train tickets, and she paid me back the next day.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loan.
  3. (reflexive) To be suitable or applicable, to fit.
    Poems do not lend themselves to translation easily.
    The long history of the past does not lend itself to a simple black and white interpretation.
  4. (proscribed) To borrow.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • lend to believe
  • have a lend
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *lenta, from Proto-Indo-European *lent 'linse'. Compare Latin lens, lentis, Old High German linsi.

NounEdit

lend f

  1. acorn
Related termsEdit

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

lend (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. flight

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 18:55