ulterior

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ulterior, comparative of ulter (that is beyond).

AdjectiveEdit

ulterior (not comparable)

  1. Situated beyond, or on the farther side.
  2. Beyond what is obvious or evident.
  3. Being intentionally concealed so as to deceive.
    • 1956–1960, R.S. Peters, The Concept of Motivation, Routledge & Kegan Paul (second edition, 1960), chapter ii: “Motives and Motivation”, page 32:
      Motives, of course, may be mixed; but this only means that a man aims at a variety of goals by means of the same course of action. Similarly a man may have a strong motive or a weak one, an ulterior motive or an ostensible one.
  4. Happening later; subsequent.
    an ulterior action
    • 1840, in The Chemist, volume 1, page 141:
      A rather deep red coloration, which appears by the action of the first bubbles of chlorine, but which soon disappears by the ulterior action of this gas []

Derived termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (intentionally concealed, to deceive): ostensible

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ulterior (comparative of ulter)

  1. further away

InflectionEdit

Third declension, comparative variant.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative ulterior ulterius ulteriōrēs ulteriōra
genitive ulteriōris ulteriōris ulteriōrum ulteriōrum
dative ulteriōrī ulteriōrī ulteriōribus ulteriōribus
accusative ulteriōrem ulterius ulteriōrēs ulteriōra
ablative ulteriōre ulteriōre ulteriōribus ulteriōribus
vocative ulterior ulterius ulteriōrēs ulteriōra

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ulterior m, f (plural ulteriores)

  1. ulterior
  2. later; subsequent

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 7 January 2014, at 00:16