Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 06:27

walker

See also: Walker

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English walkere, from Old English wealcere.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

walker (plural walkers)

  1. The agent noun of to walk: a person who walks or a thing which walks, especially a pedestrian or a participant in a walking race.
    • 1816, Jane Austen, Emma, Volume 1 Chapter 8
      "I would ask for the pleasure of your company, Mr. Knightley, but I am a very slow walker, and my pace would be tedious to you; and, besides, you have another long walk before you, to Donwell Abbey."
    • 2005, Carlo De Vito, 10 Secrets My Dog Taught Me: Life Lessons from a Man's Best Friend (page 88)
      We hired a walker for the dogs during the day.
  2. A walking frame.
  3. (often in the plural) A shoe designed for comfortable walking.
  4. A person who walks (or waulks) cloth, that is, who fulls it.
  5. A male escort who accompanies a woman to an event.
    • 1980 December 29, New York Magazine, volume 14, page 26: 
      He's really just a 'walker' for old ladies!" Walkers, now, are a special breed of pilot fish — entertaining male escorts
    • 1981, Spare rib: Volumes 108-119
      Women at the top — Lady Di and Nancy Reagan in particular — apparently have 'walkers' — men to escort them on public and private occasions providing a respectable cover, while the male who is their sexual partner is off on more pressing business.
    • 1984, Clemens David Heymann, Poor little rich girl: the life and legend of Barbara Hutton
      In the vernacular of the trade, he was what is commonly known as "a walker" — an entertaining male escort who is usually sexually unthreatening []
    • 2007, The Walker (film about a male escort)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • {{PL:pedia}}

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

walk (waulk, full, tuck) +‎ -er

NounEdit

walker m

  1. tucker

SynonymsEdit