𐌱𐌽𐌰𐌿𐌰𐌽

GothicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Old Norse gnΓΊa and Old High German niuwan. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

𐌱𐌽𐌰𐌿𐌰𐌽 β€’ (bnauan)

  1. (hapax legomenon) to rub
    • Luke 6:1b:
      𐌾𐌰𐌷 π‚πŒ°πŒΏπ€πŒΉπŒ³πŒ΄πŒ³πŒΏπŒ½ πŒ°πŒ·πƒπŒ° πƒπŒΉπ€π‰πŒ½πŒΎπ‰πƒ πŒΉπƒ 𐌾𐌰𐌷 πŒΌπŒ°π„πŒΉπŒ³πŒ΄πŒ³πŒΏπŒ½ πŒ±πŒ½πŒ°πŒΏπŒ°πŒ½πŒ³πŒ°πŒ½πƒ 𐌷𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌿𐌼.
      jah raupidΔ“dun ahsa sipōnjōs is jah matidΔ“dun bnauandans handum.
      and his disciples plucked the ears of corn, and did eat, rubbing them in their hands. (KJV)

ConjugationEdit

Only the present participle πŒ±πŒ½πŒ°πŒΏπŒ°πŒ½πŒ³πƒ (bnauands) is attested, which is not enough to determine a conjugation class. It could be a class 7 strong verb like its Old Norse and Old High German cognates, or a class 3 weak verb like π„π‚πŒ°πŒΏπŒ°πŒ½ (trauan), or an irregular verb like 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌰𐌽 (bauan).

Further readingEdit

  • Streitberg, Wilhelm (1910). Die gotische Bibel. Zweiter Teil: Gotisch-griechisch-deutsches WΓΆrterbuch. Heidelberg: Carl Winter’s UniversitΓ€tsbuchhandlung, p.Β 22