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Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/gʷʰen-

(Redirected from Appendix:Proto-Indo-European/gʷʰen-)
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This Proto-Indo-European entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Indo-EuropeanEdit

RootEdit

*gʷʰen- (imperfective)[1][2][3]

  1. to strike, slay, kill

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “ghen-(ə)-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume II, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 491-493
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*gʰen-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, ISBN 3-89500-219-4, pages 218-219
  3. ^ Cheung, Johnny (2007), “*ǰan”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-15496-4, pages 224-225
  4. ^ Demiraj, Bardhyl (1997), “gjúaj”, in Albanische Etymologien: Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz [Albanian Etymologies: Investigaitons into the Albanian Inherited Lexicon] (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 7) (in German), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, pages 191-192
  5. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2010), “ǰinǰ-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 559
  6. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “genėti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 27898 1, pages 170-171
  7. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*žę̀ti II”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 15504 6, page 561
  8. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “θείνω”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 536-537
  9. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0195083458, § 218
  10. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “-fendō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 210-211: “-fendō was derived either by suffixation of PIE *-d(ʰ)-, or the whole paradigm was derived from an original pr.ipv. sg. *fende < *gʷʰn̥dʰi ‘strike!’ (thus LIV).”
  11. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008), “kue(n)-zi / kun- / kuu̯a(n)-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-16092-7, pages 561-562
  12. ^ Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “käsk-”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, page 189
  13. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “ganyti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 27898 1, page 164
  14. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*gonìti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 15504 6, page 177
  15. ^ Ringe, Don (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic, Oxford University Press, page 106
  16. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2010), “gan”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 198