See also: eve, EVE, éve, Ève, Êve, and Eʋe

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English Eve, Eue, from Old English Eue, Æue, from Latin Eva, from Ancient Greek Εὔα (Eúa), from Biblical Hebrew חַוָּה(ḥawwā).

Proper nounEdit

Eve

  1. (Abrahamic religions) The first woman and mother of the human race; Adam's wife.
  2. An unspecified primordial woman, from whom many or all people are descended.
    The Seven Daughters of Eve; mitochondrial Eve
  3. A female given name from Hebrew.
    • 1970, L.P.Hartley, My Sister's Keeper, page 113:
      "You were always a cynic," said Edith tolerantly. "I'm sure that Eve will want to have a baby - isn't that why we called her Eve?"
      "Of course not," said Herbert, as if the baby-cult had long been irritating him. "We called her Eve, or Evelyn, after your grandmother, who was going to leave, and did leave us some money."
  4. An unincorporated community in Kentucky, United States.
  5. An unincorporated community in Missouri, United States.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A pun on eavesdropper.

Proper nounEdit

Eve

  1. (cryptography) A conventional name for an agent attempting to intercept a message sent by Alice that is intended for Bob.

Etymology 3Edit

Either a variant of Eaves or a matronymic from the given name.

Proper nounEdit

Eve

  1. An English surname​.

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Variant of Eva and a short form of Evelin.

Proper nounEdit

Eve

  1. A female given name.

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Short form of Evert and Evald, also a masculine form of Eva. First recorded as a Swedish given name in 1904.

Proper nounEdit

Eve c (genitive Eves)

  1. A male given name.

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of Eva and short form of Evelina.

Proper nounEdit

Eve c (genitive Eves)

  1. A female given name.