See also: issa, issā, and -issa

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

Issa (plural Issas or Issa)

  1. A member of a Somali clan, mainly residing in Djibouti; it is the larger of the two dominant ethnic groups.
    Until its independence in 1977, Djibouti was called the French Territory of the Afars and the Issas.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

Issa pl (plural only)

  1. Alternative form of Iswa (the Catawba, a Native American people who inhabit the Carolinas).

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A French spelling of an Arabic-derived form for Jesus. From Arabic عِيسَى(ʿīsā) or its derivatives (Wolof Isaa, Pulaar Iisaa etc.).

Proper nounEdit

Issa m

  1. A male given name from Arabic, widely used in Islamic North and West Africa.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

Issa m (plural Issas)

  1. A member of the Issa clan

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἴσσα (Íssa), possibly from an Illyrian word meaning "spas," from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eysh₂- (to move violently, rapidly). Possibly related to Isacia, a place in Lucania mentioned by Pliny.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Issa f sg (genitive Issae); first declension

  1. Vis (an island off the coast of Croatia)

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Issa
Genitive Issae
Dative Issae
Accusative Issam
Ablative Issā
Vocative Issa

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Issa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Issa in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • Issa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • How the Croatian Islands Got Their Names
  • Roller, D. W. (2018). A Historical and Topographical Guide to the Geography of Strabo. United States: Cambridge University Press, p. 286