Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

  The Tea room(+) is discussing this entry at the moment.
Please come along and share your opinions on this and the other topics being discussed there.

EtymologyEdit

Roman +‎ -o- +‎ -phile

NounEdit

Romanophile (plural Romanophiles)

  1. One who has a love of Ancient Rome.
    • 2010, Timothy Parsons, The Rule of Empires, page 50:
      Coerced British workers had to have built the grand buildings and roads that so impressed later Romanophiles.
    • 2012, Jon E. Lewis, Rome: The Autobiography
      A Romanophile, the Greek historian Polybius intended his History to explain Rome's dominance over the civilized world.
  2. One who has a love of Romania.
    • 2010, Paul R. Magocsi, A History of Ukraine: The Land and Its Peoples (page 644)
      Its first prelate was the Ukrainian-born Bukovinian Romanophile and avid promoter of all things Romanian, Metropolitan Nectari Kotlearciuc []
  3. One who has a love of the Roma people.
    • 1997, Yaron Matras, ‎Peter Bakker, ‎Khristo Kyuchukov, The Typology and Dialectology of Romani (page 199)
      George Borrow (1803-1881) has stood as the acknowledged source of inspiration for countless Romanophiles (as well as Romanophobes) ever since his literary heyday in the 19th century; in fact Brian Vesey-Fitzgerald saw himself as quite "unfashionable" (1944:x) because he was one of the few who didn't make his "first acquaintance with [Gypsies] in the pages of George Borrow".

AntonymsEdit