See also: roma, Róma, romà, romã, Rōma, and Rô-ma

English edit

 
A Roma girl in Serbia.

Etymology 1 edit

Related to Rom, from Romani rom, probably from Sanskrit डोम (ḍoma, member of a low caste of travelling musicians and dancers) or डोम्ब (ḍomba),[1] probably ultimately from the same root as Sanskrit डमरु (ḍamaru, drum).[2] Kuiper (1948), Turner (1962-6) and Beníšek (2006) suggest that the word डोम्ब (ḍomba) is of Munda origin. The names of the Lom and Dom are related. Related దొమ్మర (dommara) and डोंबारी (ḍombārī) (community of wandering artists). Folk etymology pointed to a legend that the ethnic group were an exiled people from Imperial times.

The other major categories of words for the Roma are cognates of Gypsy (words related to Egypt) and cognates of tzigane (words derived from Greek); see those entries for more information.

Alternative forms edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. A nomadic people with origins in India, the Romani.
  2. A subgroup of the Romani people found primarily in Eastern Europe.
  3. A variety of the Romani language (or occasionally) the Romani macrolanguage.
Translations edit
  • For translations which are exonyms (not cognates of the Romani term for themselves), see Gypsy.

Noun edit

Roma (plural Romas)

  1. A Romani; a member of the Roma/Romani people.
Translations edit

Adjective edit

Roma (not comparable)

  1. Romani: of or pertaining to the Roma people.
Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ See e.g. Matras, Romani, A linguistic Introduction (2005)
  2. ^   Domba on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin and Italian Roma (Rome). Doublet of Rome.

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Any of a number of places, including a city in Texas and a city in Queensland.
  2. A female given name from Latin of English-speakers.
  3. Alternative form of Rome

Noun edit

Roma (plural Romas)

  1. A variety of tomato.

Etymology 3 edit

Compare Indonesian Bahasa Romang (Roma language). This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. An Austronesian language of Indonesia.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Azerbaijani edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Catalan edit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Related terms edit

Central Nahuatl edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Franco-Provençal edit

 
Franco-Provençal Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia frp

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Galician edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Related terms edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈroːma/
  • (file)

Noun edit

Roma m pl

  1. plural of Rom
    • 2016 April 11, Caroline Kraft, quoting Gilda-Nancy Horvat, “Beleidigt, bespuckt”, in Zeit Online[1]:
      "Viele Roma positionieren sich zu Antiziganismus gar nicht, weil sie Angst haben. Sie outen sich nicht, egal, ob sie Manager, Anwälte oder Politiker sind. Der Gedanke, stolz darauf sein zu können, dass man Roma ist, erscheint immer noch absurd", meint Gilda-Nancy Horvath, selbst Romni und ORF-Journalistin.
      “Many a Rom does not take position in respect to antiziganism, by reason of fear. They don’t come out, no matter, whether they are managers, advocates or politicians. The thought of being proud about being a Rom, still appears absurd.”, opines Gilda-Nancy Horvath, herself Romni and ORF journalist.

Hawaiian edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Romans (book of the Bible)

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Italian Roma, from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈroma/
  • Rhymes: -ma, -a
  • Hyphenation: Ro‧ma

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome:
    1. the capital city of Italy.
    2. a former province of Lazio, Italy.

Alternative forms edit

  • Rom (Standard Malay)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)
  2. Rome (a former province of Lazio, Italy)
  3. the letter R in the Italian spelling alphabet

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Burmese: ရောမ (rau:ma.)
  • Japanese: ローマ (Rōma) (perhaps via Portuguese Roma)
  • Korean: 로마 (roma)

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • R (numismatic abbreviation)

Etymology edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Uncertain.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Rōma f sg (genitive Rōmae); first declension

  1. Rome (the ancient capital of the Roman Empire; capital city of modern-day Italy)
    Ut Roma iugum omnibus terris imponeret.
    That Rome might overcome all countries.
    Venit Roma.
    He came from Rome.
  2. The Roman Empire per se (as a synecdoche).
  3. (Late Latin) Rome and/or Constantinople (the latter as "Nova Roma").
  4. (Ecclesiastical Latin, poetic) The Roman Catholic Church in general.

Declension edit

First-declension noun, with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Rōma
Genitive Rōmae
Dative Rōmae
Accusative Rōmam
Ablative Rōmā
Vocative Rōma
Locative Rōmae

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Borrowings
  • Ancient Greek: Ῥώμη (Rhṓmē) (see there for further descendants)
  • Arabic: ⁧روما(rūmā)
  • Proto-Celtic: *Rūmā (see there for further descendants)
    • Proto-Germanic: *Rūmō (see there for further descendants)
  • Southern Common Slavic: *Rymъ
  • Mishnaic Hebrew: ⁧רומא
  • Middle Persian: [Term?] (/⁠Hrōmāyīg⁠/, Roman, Greek)
  • Old Irish: Róm (see there for further descendants)
  • Romanian: Roma

References edit

  • Roma”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Roma”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Anagrams edit

Latvian edit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

Etymology edit

From Latin Rōma (Rome).

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Lithuanian edit

 
Lithuanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lt

Etymology edit

From Latin Rōma (Rome).

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Declension edit

Maranao edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome

References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Italian and Latin Roma.

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Italian and Latin Roma.

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Occitan edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Related terms edit

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the ancient capital of the Roman Empire; capital city of the Papal States, in modern-day Italy)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin Rōma. Compare Old Galician-Portuguese Roma.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 79r:
      Sant peẏdro fo p̃dicar en roma. e por occaſiõ de ſimõ magus el encantador. nero el enꝑador fizolo meter en .+. dela cabeça aẏuſo e delos pies aſuſo.
      Saint Peter went to Rome to preach, and because of Simon Magus the sorcerer Nero the emperor had him put on a cross with his head down and his feet up.

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese Roma, from Latin Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: Ro‧ma

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)
  2. Rome, Ancient Rome (an ancient civilisation centred in Rome)
    Synonym: Roma Antiga
  3. the Catholic Church (Christian church centred in the Vatican)
    Synonyms: Santa Sé, Vaticano, Igreja Católica

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Romagnol edit

Alternative forms edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f (Faenza)

  1. Rome

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Related terms edit

Sardinian edit

 
Sardinian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sc

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Sicilian edit

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Spanish edit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Spanish Roma, from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈroma/ [ˈro.ma]
  • Rhymes: -oma
  • Syllabification: Ro‧ma

Proper noun edit

Roma f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Swahili edit

 
Swahili Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sw

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishروما(Roma), from Italian and Latin Roma. Doublet of Rum.

Proper noun edit

Roma

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Declension edit

References edit