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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹoˈmeɪˌni.ə/
    • (file)
  • (Michigan, Canada) IPA(key): /ɹoˈmɪˌni.ə/
  • Rhymes: -eɪniə

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Romanian român (Romanian) (in turn from Latin romanus (Roman)) + -ia.

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. A country in South-Eastern Europe, bordered by Hungary, Serbia, Bulgaria, Moldova and Ukraine.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin [Term?].

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. (academic, historical, linguistics) The Latin or Romance-speaking areas of Europe, collectively.
  2. (historical) The Byzantine Empire or its former territories.
    • 1973, Arnold Joseph Toynbee, Constantine Porphyrogenitus and his world, page 682:
      There is a significant coincidence of dates between several events: the splitting of the Paulician community in Rhomania in consequence of Séryios’s innovations; the breach between Séryios’s partisans and the East Roman Imperial Government, []
    • 1988, Donald M. Nicol, Byzantium and Venice: A Study in Diplomatic and Cultural Relations, page 208:
      The Doge of Venice was honored with his full title of dominator of one-quarter and one-eighth of the whole Empire of Romania; and he was promised repossession of all the rights and properties that his people had held in Constantinople in the years of the Latin occupation.
    • 1989, Ferenc Makk, The Árpáds and the Comneni: political relations between Hungary and Byzantium in the 12th century, page 110:
      In this letter the basileus informed the Pope that Béla III had attacked Serbia, since he was not content with his own country, “which he acquired with difficulties and with the help of the armies and the money of Rhomania [i.e. Byzantium]”.
    • 1989, David Jacoby, “From Byzantium to Latin Romania: Continuity and Change” in Latins and Greeks in the Eastern Mediterranean After 1204, page 1:
      The Fourth Crusade ended in 1204 with the Western or Latin conquest of Constantinople and signalled the beginning of a new era in the history of the Byzantine lands or Romania.
    • 1999, Rustam Shukurov, “Turkoman and Byzantine Self-Identity: Some reflections on the Logic of the Title-Making in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century Anatolia” in Eastern Approaches to Byzantium: Papers from the Thirty-Third Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies:
      If the Constantinopolitan Byzantines regarded the Anatolian Turkic territories as lands temporarily lost from their indivisible universal Rhomania, the Turkoman rulers of the twelfth century considered Rhomania as being factually divided between several rulers.
    • 2001, David Jacoby, “Changing Economic Patterns in Latin Romania: The Impact of the West” in The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World, page 197:
      The dramatic fall of Constantinople in 1204 and the Latin conquest of the Empire’s provinces in the following decade resulted in the dismemberment of Romania.
    • 2013, Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini (Pope Pius II), trans. Robert Brown, Europe (c.1400-1458), page 69:
      Next to them, the maritime region extending south to the Hellespont is Romania—a Greek nation, though it was once barbarian, and it is returning to barbarism in our own time, now that the empire of the Greeks has been destroyed and the Turks hold sway. The capital city of this country [Thrace] is Byzantium, formerly called Agios.

CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Romania f

  1. Romania

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

 
Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈromɑniɑ/, [ˈro̞mɑˌniɑ]

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. Romania

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of Romania (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative Romania
genitive Romanian
partitive Romaniaa
illative Romaniaan
singular plural
nominative Romania
accusative nom. Romania
gen. Romanian
genitive Romanian
partitive Romaniaa
inessive Romaniassa
elative Romaniasta
illative Romaniaan
adessive Romanialla
ablative Romanialta
allative Romanialle
essive Romaniana
translative Romaniaksi
instructive
abessive Romaniatta
comitative

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ῥωμανία (Rhōmanía).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. (academic, historical, linguistics) the Romance speaking areas of Europe

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Romania f

  1. Romania

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ῥωμανία (Rhōmanía).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rōmānia f sg (genitive Rōmāniae); first declension

  1. (New Latin) Romania
  2. (historical) Roman Empire
  3. (historical) Byzantine Empire

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Rōmānia
Genitive Rōmāniae
Dative Rōmāniae
Accusative Rōmāniam
Ablative Rōmāniā
Vocative Rōmānia

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. Romania

Related termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Proper nounEdit

Romania

  1. Romania

Related termsEdit