Whitsun

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

white +‎ Sunday

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Whitsun (plural Whitsuns)

  1. Whitsunday
    • 1909, Sidney Heath, Romance of Symbolism: Fonts and the symbols of baptism - The times [for baptism] of which Whitsun Eve is one, are specified by ... the constitutions for Orthobon for England, Gerona, 517, c. iv.
  2. The holiday beginning on Whitsunday
    • 1978, Peter Bailey, Leisure and class in Victorian England: Rational recreation and the contset for control, quoting "a British observation from early 20th century", read in Orvar Löfgren, On Holiday: A History of Vacationing (2002) - The excursion train used to vomit forth, at Easter and in Whitsun week, throngs of millhands of the period, cads and their flames, tawdry, blowsy, noisy, drunken.

SynonymsEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

Whitsun (not comparable)

  1. Of, or relating to Whitsunday or Whitsuntide

AnagramsEdit