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See also: Academe

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin academia, from Ancient Greek Ἀκαδημία (Akadēmía); see academy. Academe (frequently capitalized) is a poetic name for the garden or grove near ancient Athens where Plato taught, supposedly named for its former owner, the hero Ἀκάδημος (Akademos; Ἑκάδημος, Hekademos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

academe (plural academes)

  1. (historical) The name of the garden in Athens where the academics met. [from late 16th c.][1]
  2. (poetic) An academy; a place of learning. [from late 16th c.][1]
    Synonym: academy
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost:
      Navarre shall be the wonder of the world; / Our court shall be a little Academe,/ Still and contemplative in living art.
  3. (poetic) The scholarly life, environment, or community. [from mid 19th c.][1]
    Synonym: academia
  4. A senior member of the staff at an institution of higher learning; pedant. [from mid 20th c.][1]
    Synonym: pedant

Usage notesEdit

  • Poetic references are often to “the groves of Academe”, a translation of Horace’s inter silvas Academi.[2][3]

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Brown, Lesley, ed. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary. 5th. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]