See also: Senior, sénior, and sênior

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English senior, from Latin senior (older), comparative form of senex (old); see senate. Doublet of seigneur, seignior, senhor, señor, signore, sir, and sire.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

senior (comparative more senior, superlative most senior)

  1. Older; superior
    senior citizen
  2. Higher in rank, dignity, or office.
    senior member; senior counsel
  3. (US) Of or pertaining to a student's final academic year at a high school (twelfth grade) or university.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

senior (plural seniors)

  1. (now chiefly US) An old person.
    Synonyms: senior citizen; see also Thesaurus:old person
  2. Someone older than someone else (with possessive). [from 15th c.]
    He was four years her senior.
  3. Someone seen as deserving respect or reverence because of their age. [from 14th c.]
  4. (obsolete, biblical) An elder or presbyter in the early Church. [14th–16th c.]
  5. Somebody who is higher in rank, dignity, or office.
  6. (US, Philippines) A final-year student at a high school or university. [from 17th c.]

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin senior. Doublet of sire, seigneur, and sieur.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

senior m (plural seniors)

  1. (sports) senior (older player)
  2. elderly person

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Dutch senior, from Latin senior (older), comparative form of senex (old). Doublet of senyur and sinyo.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [sɛˈniɔr]
  • Hyphenation: sè‧ni‧or

Adjective edit

senior

  1. senior
    1. older; superior
    2. higher in rank, dignity, or office.

Synonyms edit

  • (in rank) kanan (Standard Malay)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Interlingua edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin senior.

Adjective edit

senior (comparative plus senior, superlative le plus senior)

  1. older

Noun edit

senior (plural seniors)

  1. lord

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Comparative of senex.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

senior (neuter senius); third declension

  1. comparative degree of senex
    1. older, elder; rather old
      Antonym: iūnior

Declension edit

Third-declension comparative adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative senior senius seniōrēs seniōra
Genitive seniōris seniōrum
Dative seniōrī seniōribus
Accusative seniōrem senius seniōrēs seniōra
Ablative seniōre seniōribus
Vocative senior senius seniōrēs seniōra

Noun edit

senior m (genitive seniōris); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) a lord, sir
    Coordinate term: seniorissa
  2. (Medieval Latin) an abbot
  3. (Medieval Latin) a husband
  4. old person, old man, older person, older man

Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative senior seniōrēs
Genitive seniōris seniōrum
Dative seniōrī seniōribus
Accusative seniōrem seniōrēs
Ablative seniōre seniōribus
Vocative senior seniōrēs

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • senior”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • senior”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • senior in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • senior in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • senior in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Anagrams edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin senior.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

senior m pers (female equivalent seniorka)

  1. doyen, senior (oldest member of the family by age)
    Synonym: nestor
    Antonym: junior
  2. doyen, elder, senior (eldest or most experienced member of a group)
    Synonyms: nestor, patriarcha
  3. senior (athlete of adult age according to the regulations of a given sport discipline)
    Antonym: junior
    Hypernym: sportowiec

Noun edit

senior m pers

  1. Sr. (title used after a father's name when his son is given the same name)
    Antonym: junior
  2. (feudalism, historical) feudal lord exercising power and guardianship over his subordinate vassal
    Antonym: wasal
    Hypernyms: feudał, zwierzchnik
  3. (historical) during the period of the division of Poland into districts, the oldest of the Piasts who exercised supreme power and to whom the other princes ruling the various districts were subordinate
    Hypernym: zwierzchnik
  4. (Protestantism) senior (senior Protestant clergyman)
    Hypernym: duchowny

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
noun

Related terms edit

nouns

Further reading edit

  • senior in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • senior in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French senior, itself borrowed from Latin senior.

Adjective edit

senior m or n (feminine singular senioră, masculine plural seniori, feminine and neuter plural seniore)

  1. senior

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin senior. Doublet of señor.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /seˈnjoɾ/ [seˈnjoɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Syllabification: se‧nior

Noun edit

senior m (plural seniores)

  1. senior (clarification of this definition is needed)